Book Review Child Of Tempus

Happy Sunday Bookish Friends

Today I Am Featuring A Book By A Debut Author

Winnifred Tataw

#ya fantasy #book Review

The Gods’ Scion: Child of Tempus

by: Winnifred Tataw

•Print Length: 182 pages

•Publisher: Winnifred Tataw (January 18, 2019)

•Publication Date: January 18, 2019

•Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC

Rodrick is a prince of the ruling country of Diar. He has a face kissed by the Gods themselves, with deep blue eyes and long ruby-red hair. Speaking of Gods, he also happens to be the Acolyte of Time. Gifts and curses with this power give him control over aspects of time. And being a dragon-human hybrid has its amazing perks too.

But since childhood, Rodrick has had a target on his back, and his insanely power-hungry father, Demon King Ryton, comes across as his closest but worst enemy. Throw in the workings of an alcoholic mother, a bipolar sister, a recovering addict brother, and an adopted little sister with magical powers, and you have the royal family of Diar.

Things couldn’t get any worse, until he meets the beautiful Princess Arcelia—but Arcelia isn’t the main problem. Her and Rodrick are on now on the run from Rodrick’s father, Ryton. And with the looming risk of world destruction ahead of them, Rodrick is worried about more than college exams.

This book was received as an ARC, in exchange for an honest review.

Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

An inventive fantasy by a debut author, Winnifred Tataw

The Gods’ Scion: Child of Tempus.

Right from the beginning you are swept up into the books enjoyable plot and likable characters that will have you cheering them on. Tataw has Created an urban/contemporary fantasy that takes on a faced passed storyline.

Rodrick a ruling prince of the country of Diar, Being a Acolyte of his time, And dragon-human. But not everything is perfect, with turbulent family dynamics and a Demon King as your Father. Impending world destruction and magical realism with a dash of romance makes this an intriguing and engaging storyline. Great dialogue and magical elements makes for well written book.

If you enjoy Ya Contemporary Fantasy than this is the perfect book for you.

I look forward to reading more books from this creative Author.

Purchase link:

Amazon.com: The Gods’ Scion: Child of Tempus eBook: Winnifred Tataw: Kindle Store

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Winnifred or Winnie, as most know her by, is an artist, writer, and author of her debut novel: The Gods’ Scion: Child of Tempus. As a military child, Winnie has traveled extensively around the US East Coast and Germany, learning about the history, lore and culture of each region. Winnie has spent the last two years writing and expanding the world of  The Gods’ Scion trilogy series. Winnie has had a lifelong love of literature and art.  As a new writer she wants to create beautiful fantasy world and with compelling and intriguing characters. Winnie resides in South Carolina and is an undergraduate at the College of Charleston. She loves to spread positivity and joy to those around her, and look at the world through a glittery pink lens.

Have a wonderful Day

Book Tour All The Bad Apples

#penguinteen #allthebadapples

Title: All the Bad Apples

Author: Moïra Fowley-Doyle

Genre: YA, Magical Realism

Publisher:  Penguin UK / Kathy Dawson Books  US

Publication date: August 1 / August 27 2019

Hardcover: 352 pages

@penguinteen

Huge thanks to Penguin for sending me an early copy of this book!
Trigger warnings for homophobia, abortion, suicide, rape, abuse, forced pregnancy.

‘It’s on every woman in this country. Kept in shame and silence for generations. Kicked out, locked up, taken away. Their children sold in illegal adoptions; their babies buried in unmarked graves. Forced pregnancies and back-street abortions, eleven a day on the boat to England only to come home to rejection and stigma. Insults and prayers and keeping up appearances – and how do you break a curse like that?’

“Some loves ignite like forest fires, burn down entire towns before anybody’s noticed. . . Some loves smolder like a turf fire, are slow to start but will then burn bright and steady through entire winters.”

“A good cup of tea is a witch’s brew,” the old women said together with wicked grins. “Heals all ills.”

The stunning new novel about silenced female voices, family secrets and dangerous truths from the author of The Accident Season.

‘Exquisite . . . This is a book to hold tightly to your chest’ Irish Times

‘Lyrical . . . Compelling’ Guardian

‘Beautiful, visceral . . . A primal scream’ Louise O’Neill

‘Uncompromising, raw, devastating’ Publishers Weekly

‘I am in absolute awe of it’ Melinda Salisbury

Moïra Fowley-Doyle is half-French, half-Irish and made of equal parts feminism, whimsy and Doc Martens. She lives in Dublin where she writes magic realism, reads tarot cards and raises witch babies.

Moïra’s first novel, The Accident Season, was shortlisted for the 2015 Waterstones Children’s Book Prize & the North East Teen Book Awards, nominated for the Carnegie Medal & won the inaugural School Library Association of Ireland Great Reads Award. It received two starred reviews & sold in ten territories. Her second novel, Spellbook of the Lost and Found, was published in summer 2017, received a starred review from School Library Journal and was shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards.


Book Tour The Great Jewel Robbery

The Great Jewel Robbery:A Front Page Mystery Book 1
Elizabeth McKenna
Category: Adult Fiction, 204 pages
Genre: Cozy mystery
Publisher: Elizabeth McKenna
Release date: May 28, 2019
Tour dates: August 19-30, 2019
Content Rating: PG-13

There is no profanity. There is drinking, desire, and a kiss.

Synopsis

Mystery with a splash of romance…Chicago Tribune reporters Emma and Grace have been best friends since college despite coming from different worlds. When Grace is assigned to cover an annual charity ball and auction being held at a lakeside mansion and her boyfriend bails on her, she brings Emma as her plus one. The night is going smoothly until Emma finds the host’s brother unconscious in the study. Though at first it is thought he was tipsy and stumbled, it soon becomes clear more is afoot, as the wall safe is empty and a three-million-dollar diamond necklace is missing. With visions of becoming ace investigative journalists, Emma and Grace set out to solve the mystery, much to the chagrin of the handsome local detective.

To read more reviews, please visit Elizabeth McKenna’s page on iRead Book Tours.

This book was received from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

The Great Jewel Robbery by Elizabeth McKenna is the first book in this delightful cozy mystery series.

Chicago Tribune reporters Emma and Grace have been best friends since college despite coming from different worlds. Grace has been assigned to cover an annual charity ball and auction being held at a Lakeside Mansion on shores of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. When her boyfriend has a change of plans she brings Emma along.

I was immediately sucked into the narrative and devoured every single page of this highly entertaining and deceptive book. Once I started reading it I was hooked and so absorbed in the storyline that I lost all sense of time. The author ability to keep my attention in this intriguing cozy mystery. I was definitely lost in this book and nothing was going to distract me until I finished reading it.

An entertaining and quick read with the right amount of romance, a robbery, murder..a weekend party at a mansion. What more could you ask for?

This is a fun, breezy mystery that totally enchanted me. The storyline is engaging tension filled who-did -it.

A great light hearted mystery, that keeps you guessing all the way through.

Faced paced exceptional dialogue with well developed characters.

I definitely recommend this book and I am looking forward to reading more from this author.

Do you read cozy mysteries, The light hearted who don it’s?

Cozy Sweet Cream Pancakes Recipe

• All-Purpose Flour

• Baking Powder

• Baking Soda

• Salt

• Sugar

• Eggs

• Vanilla Extract

• Heavy Cream

• Milk, to thin the batter if desired

Toppings for Pancakes

These pancakes may take a few extra minutes to cook, but boy is it worth it! I feel like pancakes are kind of like the blank canvas of breakfast food!

You can add different toppings to create totally different experiences.

Gwendalyn G Anderson

Meet the Author: 

Elizabeth McKenna’s love of books reaches back to her childhood, where her tastes ranged from Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys to Stephen King’s horror stories. She had never read a romance novel until one Christmas when her sister gave her the latest bestseller by Nora Roberts. She was hooked from page one (actually, she admits it was the first love scene). She combined her love of history, romance, and a happy ending to write the historical romance novels Cera’s Place and Venice in the Moonlight. Her contemporary romance novel, First Crush Last Love, is loosely based on her life (she eventually married her first crush)

The Great Jewel Robbery is her debut cozy mystery, and she hopes readers will like it as much as they have enjoyed her romances. Elizabeth lives in Wisconsin with her understanding husband, two beautiful daughters, and a sassy Labrador. When she isn’t writing, working, or being a mom, she’s sleeping.

Connect with the author: Facebook ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Instagram

Enter the Giveaway!
Ends Sept 6, 2019

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Book Review THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE

Hello Everyone,

TodayI Am Sharing My Review Of The Winemaker’s Wife

#thewinemakerswife #Reviewathon

THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE

The Winemaker’s Wife

Hardcover: 400 pages

Publisher: Gallery Books (August 13, 2019)

Champagne, 1940: Inès has just married Michel, the owner of storied champagne house Maison Chauveau, when the Germans invade. As the danger mounts, Michel turns his back on his marriage to begin hiding munitions for the Résistance. Inès fears they’ll be exposed, but for Céline, half-Jewish wife of Chauveau’s chef de cave, the risk is even greater—rumors abound of Jews being shipped east to an unspeakable fate.

When Céline recklessly follows her heart in one desperate bid for happiness, and Inès makes a dangerous mistake with a Nazi collaborator, they risk the lives of those they love—and the champagne house that ties them together.

New York, 2019: Liv Kent has just lost everything when her eccentric French grandmother shows up unannounced, insisting on a trip to France. But the older woman has an ulterior motive—and a tragic, decades-old story to share. When past and present finally collide, Liv finds herself on a road to salvation that leads right to the caves of the Maison Chauveau.

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Instant #1 bestseller from The Globe and Mail (Toronto) and The Toronto Star

“Love and betrayal, forgiveness and redemption combine in a heady tale of the ever-present past…fantastic!” —Pam Jenoff, New York Times bestselling author of The Lost Girls of Paris

The author of the “engrossing” (People) international bestseller The Room on Rue Amélie returns with a moving story set amid the champagne vineyards of northern France during the darkest days of World War II, perfect for fans of Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale.

Review

This book was received from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

“Mark Twain, the great American writer was spot on when he claimed: “too much of anything is bad, but too much Champagne is just right”.

The Winemaker’s Wife

Champagne, 1940, at the cusp of the Second World War, Inès is the young wife of Michel, owner of the Maison Chauveau, a picturesque champagne house nestled among rolling vineyards near Reims, France. It should be an idyllic life, but Inès–who’s often treated like a child by her husband, his chef de cave, Theo, and Theo’s wife, Céline– is increasingly unhappy.

She’s determined to make a change, but then the German’s arrive.

Kristin Harmel narration is told through dual timelines from Liv’s life in the present and then between Inès and Céline during the war in the late 1930s-1940s. The contemporary chapters propel the story along, but past is a turbulent secretive echo of historical fiction.

Devastated, and heartbroken Olivia, has just recently been divorced is relived to have an excuse to go to France with Edith, her wealthy 97 year old grandmother.

While there Olivia grandmother Edith, slowly tells her incredible story of her and her friends the life she led during the German occupation of the village where she lived with her husband.

This is a dramatic and intricate storyline infused with World War II elements of tragedy, betrayal, and brutality, tempered with love, devotion and heroism. The author masterly allows the reader to unravel the threads of this literary tapestry.

Brilliant progression as the storyline gives you an incredible look at the French resistance during the German occupation amid the champagne vineyards of northern France. The author has created a compelling character driven, emotional resonate novel.

What really stood out for me and what I really loved about this story was the compelling and emotional layered duel timelines and how they connected the story and the family. We see the historical side to the story and then a modern side to it. Each are strong, interesting stories with their conflicts and heartache that shaped the people.

A deeply thoughtful historical fiction novel, based on details of real-life Resistance activities that occurred in France during World War II.

RELEASE DATE: AUGUST 13, 2019

Thanks to @kristinharmel and @gallerybooks

#thewinemakerswife
50 Book Reviews

What should we eat

while drinking champagne!

One of our favorite indulgences is lying on the couch with a good book and a bag of our favorite potato chips. Can’t get better than that, right? WRONG! Kristin Harmel, the author of THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE, has just made that experience better by telling us that we shouldn’t be drinking water or soda with those chips—we should be drinking champagne!

THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE, a historical novel set in the Champagne region of WW2 France, so she’s done a lot of research on champagne and is here to tell us that you don’t have to save that bubbly for a special occasion—it’s a great wine to sip with many foods, plenty of them not fancy at all. 

So pour yourself a cold glass of your favorite champagne, open that bag of chips, and discover the other surprising foods you could be eating alongside your bubbly! Watch Kristin share her suggestions in the video above, or keep reading for a transcript of her picks:

#1: Potato chips

The sharpness of champagne, its acidity, cuts perfectly through the salt. 

Which means that it also goes pretty perfectly with…

#2: French fries

#3: Spicy foods

The bubbles can balance out heat, so if you’re diving into something spicy, like a great spicy pad thai, pop open a bottle.

#4: Raw fish

Raw fish, especially sushi, is also an excellent pairing.

As is…

#5: Salty, buttery popcorn

Not only do the bubbles work perfectly with the butter, but the yeasty notes in champagne from Champagne, France, complement the toastiness of the popcorn.

#5: Fried chicken

Remember that acidity we mentioned? It also cuts perfectly through the grease in fried foods. So the next time you bring home a bucket of fried chicken, believe it or not, pop a bottle of champagne.

If you enjoyed her recommendations, be sure to check

out Kristin Harmel’s novel set in Champagne, France: THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE.

Excerpt

The Winemaker’s Wife  one  
MAY 1940
INÈS  
The road snaked over the lush vineyards of Champagne as Inès Chauveau sped southwest out of Reims, clouds of dust ballooning in the wake of her glossy black Citroën, wind whipping ferociously through her chestnut hair. It was May, and already the vines were awakening, their buds like tiny fists reaching for the sun. In weeks they would flower, and by September, their grapes—pale green Chardonnay, inky Pinot Meunier, blueberry-hued Pinot Noir—would be plump and bursting for the harvest.But would Inès still be here? Would any of them? A shiver ran through her as she braked to hug a curve, the engine growling in protest as she turned down the road that led home. Michel would tell her she was driving too quickly, too recklessly. But then, he was cautious about everything.In June, it would be a year since they’d married, and she couldn’t remember a day during that time that he hadn’t gently chided her about something. I’m simply looking out for you, Inès, he always said. That’s what a husband is supposed to do. Lately, nearly all his warnings had been about the Germans, who’d been lurking just on the other side of the impenetrable Maginot Line, the fortified border that protected France from the chaos besetting the rest of Europe. Those of us who were here for the Great War know to take them seriously, he said at least once a day, as if he hadn’t been just four years old when the final battle was waged.Of course Inès, younger than Michel by six years, hadn’t yet been born when the Germans finally withdrew from the Marne in 1918, after nearly obliterating the central city of Reims. But her father had told enough tales about the war—usually while drunk on brandy and pounding his fist against the table—that she knew to be wary.You can never trust the Huns! She could hear her father’s deep, gravelly voice in her ear now, though he’d been dead for years. They might play the role of France’s friend, but only fools would believe such a thing.Well, Inès was no fool. And this time, for once, she would bring the news that changed everything. She felt a small surge of triumph, but as she raced into Ville-Dommange, the silent, somber, seven-hundred-year-old Saint-Lié chapel that loomed over the small town seemed to taunt her for her pettiness. This wasn’t about who was wrong and who was right. This was about war. Death. The blood of young men already soaking the ground in the forests to the northeast. All the things her husband had predicted.She drove through the gates, braked hard in front of the grand two-story stone château, and leapt out, racing for the door that led down to the vast network of underground cellars. “Michel!” she called as she descended two stone steps at a time, the cool, damp air like a bucket of water to the face. “Michel!”Her voice echoed through the tangled maze of passageways, carved out of the earth three quarters of a century earlier by her husband’s eccentric great-grandfather. Thousands of champagne bottles rested on their sides there, a small fortune of bubbles waiting for their next act.“Inès?” Michel’s concerned voice wafted from somewhere deep within the cellars, and then she could hear footsteps coming closer until he rounded the corner ahead of her, followed by Theo Laurent, the Maison Chauveau’s chef de cave, the head winemaker. “My dear, what is it?” Michel asked as he rushed to her, putting his hands on her shoulders and studying her face. “Are you quite all right, Inès?”“No.” She hadn’t realized until then how breathless she was from the news and the drive and the rapid descent into the chill of the cellars. “No, Michel, I’m not all right at all.”“What’s happened?” Michel asked while Theo regarded her silently, his expression as impassive as always.“It has begun,” Inès managed to say. “The invasion, Michel. The Germans are coming!”A heavy silence hung in the damp air. How long would it be before the quiet of the cellars was punctured by the thud of goose-stepping boots overhead? Before everything they’d built was threatened, perhaps destroyed?“Well then,” Michel said at last. “I suppose it is time we finish hiding the champagne.”

Mark Twain, the great American writer was spot on when he claimed: “too much of anything is bad, but too much Champagne is just right”.

Ever since it was “discovered” in France in the 17th century, just about everyone has fallen under the spell of the effervescent wine. It can only be made in Champagne, north east France to have the status of Champagne the drink. There are more than 100 Champagne houses and 19000 grape growers, of these only around 2000 make and sell Champagne. There are an astonishing 50,000 different Champagne labels, so, if you thought Champagne was Champagne – think again. Tastes and prices vary widely. Part of the fun of being a Champagne drinker is working out which one you like best.

Raise a glass to Ruinart

Ruinart (pronounced Reenart) was founded in 1729, and it was the first established Champagne house and is therefore the oldest in France. In fact the company started on 1 September 1729. We know this because Nicolas Ruinart, the 32 year old founder, wrote in his ledger book that day that he was starting a business devoted to “wine with bubbles”. The ledger book takes pride of place in the entrance to the house.

History of Ruinart

Nicolas Ruinart’s uncle was a monk, Dom Thierry Ruinart, born in Champagne but sent to an Abbey in Paris. Whilst there he learned of a new “wine with bubbles” that the young nobles enjoyed. At that stage it wasn’t known as Champagne. It’s entirely possible that Dom Ruinart knew Dom Perignon the “inventor” of Champagne. They lived at the same time, shared the same interests and in fact both are buried in nearby Hautvilliers.

Dom Thierry told his brother about the new-fangled sparkling wine whose son, Nicolas, picked up the idea and ran with it, 20 years after his uncle died in 1709. The Ruinarts were textile merchants at that time and Nicolas owned some vineyards. He started out making Champagne for clients as gifts. But, the sparkling wine was a runaway success. Just 6 years after producing the first bottle, he gave up the textile business and concentrated on the Champagne.

About The Author

Kristin Harme

Kristin Harmel is the international bestselling author of THE ROOM ON RUE AMELIE, THE SWEETNESS OF FORGETTING, THE LIFE INTENDED, WHEN WE MEET AGAIN, and several other novels. Her latest, THE WINEMAKER’S WIFE, is coming in August 2019 from Gallery Books/Simon & Schuster. A former reporter for PEOPLE magazine, Kristin has also freelanced for many other publications, including American Baby, Men’s Health, Glamour, Woman’s Day, Travel + Leisure, and more.
Kristin grew up in Peabody, Mass.; Worthington, Ohio; and St. Petersburg, Fla., and she graduated with a degree in journalism (with a minor in Spanish) from the University of Florida. After spending time living in Paris, she now lives in Orlando, Fla., with her husband and young son.

Blog Tour A House Of Rage & Sorrow

#ATourOfRageAndSorrow @CaffeineTours, @SkyPonyPress, @SanguMandanna

A House of Rage and Sorrow

Author: Sangu Mandanna

Book Two in the Celestial Series 

Published: 3rd September 2019

Publisher: Sky Pony Press

Cover Designer: Kate Gartner |

Source: Publisher/Caffeine Book Tours via Edelweiss

Sangu Mandanna’s Website

One kingdom. One crown. One family.

“Maybe it’s time the great House of Rey came to an end. After all, what are we now? Just a house of rage and sorrow.”

Esmae once wanted nothing more than to help her golden brother win the crown of Kali but that dream died with her best friend. Alexi broke her heart, and she vowed to destroy him for it. And with her sentient warship Titania beside her, how can she possibly fail?

As gods, beasts, and kingdoms choose sides, Alexi seeks out a weapon more devastating than even Titania. Past lives threaten the present. Old enemies claim their due. And Esmae cannot outrun the ghosts and the questions that haunt her. What really happened to her father? What was the third boon her mother asked of Amba? For in the shadows, lurking in wait, are secrets that will swallow her whole.

The House of Rey is at war. And the entire galaxy will bleed before the end.

Amazon | Goodreads

Thank you to Caffeine Blog Tours for allowing me to take part in this blog tour, and to Edelweiss and Sky Pony Press for this free e-ARC of the novel.

A House of Rage and Sorrow, picks up a few months after A Spark of White Fire finish. This is an action packed book, that blends Mahabharata Hindu mythology, along with an Epic Science-Fiction to creative an enjoyable powerful Space Opera.

A vivid, gripping brilliant sequel with a turbulent continuous moving plot-line, that readers will not be able to put down.

A House of Rage and Sorrow, starts off quickly from within its first chapters and then just goes full steam. In this second installment, the author continues to masterly create some of the most amazing world building and the characters come to life much more here than in the previous introductory book in this trilogy.

The book is an complexity of political intrigue, and nail biting roller coaster of a ride.

The Authors vibrant characters, and interesting plots inspired by existing Hindu folklore. Sangu Mandanna has masterly recreated the interwoven Mahabharata mythology, while adding her own twist. I was captivated from page one. I found this story to be engrossing, well thought out.

Perfectly paced and captivating with rich imaginable world building. The storyline is engaging and compelling, The novel is so intriguing, and well-written, with absolutely fantastic characters that totally captivated and fascinated me. I really enjoyed the multi-POV’s, I’m fairly sure rarely any reader gets the chance to see a sentient of a warship’s Point of view.

The strength of this novel handsdown is the author’s fabulous characterizations,

I was captivated and totally invested in the characters struggles in this emotional, sometimes heartbreaking riveting tale. A perfectly created explosive, cliffhanger of ending ending.

International Giveaway 

Make sure to enter the Giveaway!

The prize is for the privilege of naming one of the Book 3 characters. It will have one winner, and the giveaway is taking place on Caffeine Book Tours twitter! It is of course open internationally.

Named one of the best 25 space opera books by BookRiot!

The first book in a scifi retelling of the Mahabrahata. When Esmae wins a contest of skill, she sets off events that trigger an inevitable and unwinnable war that pits her against the family she would give anything to return to.

In a universe of capricious gods, dark moons, and kingdoms built on the backs of spaceships, a cursed queen sends her infant daughter away, a jealous uncle steals the throne of Kali from his nephew, and an exiled prince vows to take his crown back. 

Raised alone and far away from her home on Kali, Esmae longs to return to her family. When the King of Wychstar offers to gift the unbeatable, sentient warship Titania to a warrior that can win his competition, she sees her way home: she’ll enter the competition, reveal her true identity to the world, and help her famous brother win back the crown of Kali. 

It’s a great plan. Until it falls apart. 

Inspired by the Mahabharata and other ancient Indian stories, A Spark of White Fire is a lush, sweeping space opera about family, curses, and the endless battle between jealousy and love.

The Author

Sangu Mandanna was four years old when an elephant chased her down a forest road and she decided to write her first story about it. Seventeen years and many, many manuscripts later, she signed her first book deal. Sangu now lives in Norwich, a city in the east of England, with her husband and kids.

Author Links:

Author website  Goodreads  Twitter 

Book Tour Cover Reveal

Hello Everyone,

Today I Am Partnered with HFBT And

The Author Nancy Bilyeau,

To Bringing You This Gorgeous Cover Reveal

#DreamlandCoverReveal @NancyBilyeauAuthor @EndeavourMedia1 @Tudorscribe @Endeavour_Media @EndeavourQuill

Dreamland
by Nancy Bilyeau

Publication Date: January 16, 2020
Endeavor Quill

Genre: Historical Fiction

@NancyBilyeauAuthor @EndeavourMedia1

@Tudorscribe @Endeavour_Media @EndeavourQuill

The year is 1911 when twenty-year-old heiress Peggy Batternberg is invited to spend the summer in America’s Playground.

But the invitation to Coney Island is unwelcome. Despite hailing from one of America’s richest families, Peggy would much rather spend the summer at the Moonrise Bookstore where she works voluntarily, than keeping up appearances with Brooklyn socialites and her snobbish, controlling family.

But soon it transpires that the hedonism of Coney Island affords Peggy more of the freedom she has been longing for. For one, she finds herself in love with a troubled pier-side artist of humble means, whom the Batternberg patriarchs would surely disapprove of.

Disapprove they may, but hidden behind their pomposity lurks a web of deceit, betrayal and deadly secrets. And as bodies begin to mount up amidst the sweltering clamour of Coney Island, it seems the powerful Batternbergs can get away with anything…even murder.s

It is up to Peggy to overcome the oppression of her family and clear the name of her vulnerable lover, before she or her beloved sister become the next victims of Dreamland.

Extravagant, intoxicating and thumping with suspense, bestselling Nancy Bilyeau’s magnificent Dreamland is a story of corruption, class and dangerous obsession.

About the Author

“Dreamland” is Nancy Bilyeau’s fifth novel of historical suspense. She is the author of the best-selling historical thriller “The Blue” and the Tudor mystery series “The Crown,” “The Chalice,” and “The Tapestry,” on sale in nine countries.

Nancy is a magazine editor who has lived in the United States and Canada. She studied History and English Literature at the University of Michigan. After moving to New York City, she worked on the staffs of “InStyle,” “Good Housekeeping,” and “Rolling Stone.” She is currently the deputy editor of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at the Research Foundation of CUNY and a regular contributing writer to “Town & Country” and “Mystery Scene Magazine.”

Nancy’s mind is always in past centuries but she currently lives with her husband and two children in Forest Hills in the borough of Queens. “Dreamland” is her first novel set in her adopted hometown of New York City.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | BookBub

Cover Reveal Schedule

Monday, August 19
A Bookish Affair
Gwendalyn’s Books
What Is That Book About

Tuesday, August 20
Clarissa Reads it All
Just One More Chapter
Books In Their Natural Habitat

Wednesday, August 21
Unabridged Chick
Donna’s Book Blog
Let Them Read Books

Thursday, August 22
A Book Geek
The Lit Bitch
Tar Heel Reader
Kris Waldherr Art & Words

Friday, August 23
I’m All About Books
Lost_in_a_book_reviewer
Historical Fiction with Spirit

Saturday, August 24
Broken Teepee
Passages to the Past
Locks, Hooks and Books

Sunday, August 25
A Darn Good Read
Orange County Readers
So Many Books, So Little Time

Monday, August 26
Coffee and Ink
Jessica Belmont
Maiden of the Pages

Featured Book Reviewer

Book Tour and Review

Hi book-lovers!

And welcome to my stop

on the blog tour

for The Devil’s Apprentice

@K_B_Andersen @RRBookTours1 #TheDevilsApprentice #TheGreatDevilWar

TheDevils

I’m very excited to share this book with you all today! The Devil’s Apprentice in the first book in the incredibly imaginative, and wonderfully entertaining, YA Fantasy series, The Great Devil War.

There will be exclusive content and a giveaway so be sure to read on!

The-Devil’s-Apprentice_l

The Devil’s Apprentice (The Great Devil War #1)

Genre: YA Fantasy

Philip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne?

Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think. – Kenneth B. Andersen

Add to Goodreads

Excerpt

“You’re fairly young, aren’t you?” A forked tongue moistened his scaly fingers, and he flipped through more pages. “How old are you?”

“I’m thirteen.”

“Thirteen?” the beast mumbled, clearly impressed. “It’s not very often they come to us so young. You must’ve done something really horrific.”

“What do you mean?” Philip shook his head. “What is this place?”

“This place?” The monster raised an eyebrow. “Haven’t you figured it out yet? Oh well, evilness and stupidity often go hand in hand.” His crooked smile revealed pointed teeth, and his gruff voice lowered to a hiss. “This, my boy, is the outer court of Hell. That—” he directed a hooked nail at the black gate, “is Hell.”

“Hell?” Philip whispered, and he saw it all again in his mind. The cat that had spoken to him. The shove to his back that had sent him hurtling into the street. Sam’s triumphant howling. The sound of squealing brakes. The car and the elderly man behind the wheel. And the darkness that had followed.

A dream, he’d said as he stood at the top of the long stairwell, knowing deep inside that it was a lie. This was no dream.

The car hit me, he thought. It hit me, and I’m dead. I died, and now I’m in… in…

“Hell?” he repeated, totally confused. How could he be in Hell? Only evil people went to Hell. Right? “I’m in Hell?”

“You need to say that three times before it sinks in?” the demon said, skimming through his book. “But it could be worse. Plenty others have to say it many more times before it sinks in. Ah, here it is! Let me see.” From the breast pocket of his robe he drew out a pair of silver-framed spectacles and put them on. The demon scanned the page quickly, using his finger as a guide.

“Just like I said,” he shouted angrily, pounding the book with his balled fist. “No one was supposed to enter tonight! Not for a few hours anyway, when an entire troop of politicians were to arrive!” The creature shook his head resignedly. “Well, since you’ve already spoiled my night off, I might as well send you straight to your punishment. What is your name, kid?”

Philip didn’t reply, but stared at the demon, dumbstruck.

“Wake up! We don’t have all night. Eternity waits. Your name?”

Philip cleared his throat timidly. “Philip.”

“Philip, Philip, Philip,” the demon mumbled, riffling back and forth a few pages. He wrinkled his brow. “That’s odd. Last name?”

Philip told him his full name, and once again the demon searched in his book. The wrinkles in his brow deepened, and his yellow nails scratched at his scalp. Then he shook his head and clapped the book shut with a sigh. “That name isn’t in the registry. Some dumb fool has made a mistake, kid. You’re not supposed to be here.”

“I’m not?” Philip said and felt a warm relief spreading through him. Then his eyes fell on the inky, thick darkness that enveloped the walls of Hell, and his sense of relief vanished. “Then where should I be?”

Available on Amazon!

The Great Devil War Books 1 – 3

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For your chance to win a digital copy of The Devil’s Apprentice, click the link below!

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“Let that be your first lesson, Philip. Down here, humor is always dark.”

The Devil’s Apprentice, Is the First in a series of The Great Devil War Books

A fun an intriguing adventure fantasy that is full of dark humor, and fantasy world building.

A mistake and a twist of fate, sets in motion the storyline.

Cleverly written in third POV of Philip Engle, a thirteen-year-old boy who lives with his mother and who lost his father when he was very young.

The book is a page-turner, there are heroes and villain and it’s absolutely hilarious. Rich fantasy world building that is both imaginative and engaging.

Descriptive details, along with snarky humor keep you captivated.

The author combines Christian theology, mystery with coming-of-age twisted plot.  It made good use of biblical mythology and tries to give a convincing argument as to why evil is necessary. Anderson, creatively draws you into feeling empathy for Lucifer and the fate of his hellish kingdom. 

The writing PG since this is a middle grade book but its concept and dark humor might elevate it to an older audiences.

Most of the book takes pace in fictional Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will. A bookish tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective.

Thank you so much for reading book lovers!

I love discussing wonderful books with all of you so please comment below and let me know your thoughts. Do you see yourself reading this book? Do you love the genre?

Have a Wonderful Day

About the Author

kba_5_thumb

I WAS BORN IN DENMARK ON A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT IN NOVEMBER 1976 …

… and I began writing when I was a teenager. My first book was a really awful horror novel titled Nidhug’s Slaves. It didn’t get published. Luckily.

During the next 7 years, I wrote nearly 20 novels–all of which were rejected–while working as a school teacher. The rest of the time I spent writing.

In 2000 I published my debut fantasy book, The Battle of Caïssa, and that’s when things really took off. Since then I’ve published more than thirty-five books for children and young adults in genres ranging from fantasy to horror and science fiction.

My books have been translated into more than 15 languages and my series about the superhero Antboy has been adapted for film, which is available on Netflix. An animated tv series is currently in development.

A musical of The Devil’s Apprentice opened in the fall 2018 and the movie rights for the series have also been optioned.

I live in Copenhagen with my wife, two boys, a dog named Milo and spiders in the basement.

About THE GREAT DEVIL WAR: The Great Devil War was published in Denmark from 2005-2016, beginning with The Devil’s Apprentice.

Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think.

Welcome to the other side!

Kenneth B. Andersen | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

TheDevils

Blog Tour Schedule

August 19th

Reads & Reels (Review) http://readsandreels.com

The Magic of Wor(l)ds (Interview) http://themagicofworlds.wordpress.com

Jessica Belmont (Review) https://jessicabelmont.wordpress.com/

Gwendalyn’s Books (Review) https://gwendalynbooks.blog/

August 20th

YA/NA Book Divas (Excerpt) http://www.yabookdivas.com/

Ity Reads Books (Review) http://www.ityreadsbooks.home.blog

Reviews and Promos by Nyx (Review) https://nyxblogs.wordpress.com/

Quirky Cats Fat Stacks (Review) https://quirkycatsfatstacks.com/

August 21st

B is for Book Review (Excerpt) https://bforbookreview.wordpress.com

The Faerie Review (Review) http://www.thefaeriereview.com

An Ocean A Glimmer (Review) http://anoceanglimmer.wordpress.com

August 22nd

Jaunts & Haunts (Review) https://jonathanpongratz.com/

Shalini’s Books and Reviews (Review) https://bookreviewsbyshalini.com/

The Bookworm Drinketh (Review) http://thebookwormdrinketh.wordpress.com/

I Love Books and Stuff (Excerpt) https://ilovebooksandstuffblog.wordpress.com

August 23rd

Breakeven Books (Excerpt) https://breakevenbooks.com

Entertainingly Nerdy (Review) https://www.entertaininglynerdy.com

Cats Luv Coffee (Review) https://catsluvcoffeez.blogspot.com/

Blog Tour Organized By

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R&R Book Tours

Book Review The Doll Factory

Hi everyone!

So today I’m reviewing Elizabeth Macneal’s debut, The Doll Factory

the doll factory small

Title: The Doll Factory

Author: Elizabeth Macneal

Published: April 30th 2019 Uk

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

Pages: 336

Genres:  Fiction, Historical, Gothic Victorian, Thriller

RRP: $29.99

Rating: 4 stars

USA RELEASE DATE: AUGUST 13, 2019

The Doll Factory is the debut novel from Elizabeth Macneal. The recipient of the 2018 New Caledonia Novel Award, The Doll Factory is a potent historical tale, exposing a world filled with artistry, passion, compulsion and control. A book that thrusts the reader into days gone by, The Doll Factory is a highly authentic and fresh tale from an emerging author.

The Doll Factory has been a subject to a 14-way bidding war and has been snapped up for television already. I can never resist a shiny new debut, and this one didn’t disappoint. It’s an evocative, gothic Victorian thriller which starts slow before building a crescendo to fever pitch.

It won the Caledonia Novel Award 2018 and film and TV rights have sold to Buccaneer Media. It is a Sunday Times Top Ten Bestseller, a Radio 2 Book Club pick, and Radio 4 Book at Bedtime.

You can purchase The Doll Factory (Picador) here. Us August 13

TheDoll Factory was published on 30th April 2019 Uk

by Pan Macmillan. Details on how to purchase the book can be found here.

Excerpt

He sees a child dart forward and snatch a red handkerchief from a lady’s purse.  He peers closer, recognizing that scruff of pale hair.  The familiarity is a balm, a reminder that he is not alone in this roiling mass of industry.  Silas smiles, and calls out, ‘Albie!’
But the boy does not hear him.  And then Silas understands: he has been caught.  A woman’s hand is on his wrist, the handkerchief a limp flag in his fist, and Silas slips on a piece of turf in his haste to hurry over, readying himself to play Albie’s rescuer, to beg her not to notify the authorities – but then he sees that Albie is laughing.
Silas looks at the woman more closely.  She is as tall as a man and has her red hair tidied into a long plait.  She is – Flick?  Grown up, womanly.  But it cannot be.  This woman has a slight stoop on her left side.
It is as if a bell has been rung in an old house.  Silas has felt the tremor of the wire as it runs deeper into the building, through walls and floors.  He stands transfixed, watching as the vibrations set a series of smaller bells ringing.
He could not say what it means.

– Elizabeth Macneal, The Doll Factory

Opening sentence: 

“When the streets are at their darkest and quietest, a girl settles at a small desk in the cellar of a dollmaker’s shop.”

In the art of the Pre-Raphaelites, we see a marriage of visual art and literature. Their early works are filled with scenes from the literary world, taken from authors such as Shakespeare, Tennyson, and Keats. These works demonstrate the interconnection of artistic expression and the written word in a way that goes far deeper than merely illustrating

Iris is our leading lady. Alongside her twin sister, Rose, they toil away at Mrs Salter’s Doll Emporium creating objects of beauty. But Iris is unsettled. She wants to paint, she wants the freedom to create her own masterpieces, not just what someone demands of her. I did feel for Iris, she is trapped in an uninspiring situation and when she is offered opportunity for something better, she grabs it. I became her cheerleader as I read this book, she is strong, talented and full of ambition.

This new life leads her to become involved in with the pre-Raphaelite’s and we meet the key artistic figures of this movement. Elizabeth Macneal has seamlessly and brilliantly inserted real-life people into a work of fiction. I didn’t know a great deal about the pre-Raphaelite’s before reading this, but after I finished it, I whiled away some time Googling and looking at the stunning works of art and have fallen head over heels for them. I love it when a book prompts me to do a little research!

The story is told from multi-view perspectives, Iris’ as well as from, Albie the street urchin’s and from Silas, an obsessive collector of weird and wonderful things.

Iris and Silas have a brief encounter, after being introduced by Albie, to which they have very different reactions to! As you read this, you do become very aware of a creeping sense of danger and tension. Especially the further along you get in Silas’s narrative. The tension slowly builds and builds and it leads you to a chilling, dramatic conclusion.

If you historical fiction, or are just in the mood for some creepy Victorian fiction, thenThe Doll Factory might be for you. Macneal has captured London perfectly; evoking all the seedy bars and fancy houses and everywhere in between. Her characters are beautifully rendered; they are endlessly fascinating to watch and I was disappointed when the book ended.

It is hard to imagine this is a debut as it is really impressive; great characters, evocative writing and a truly gripping story.

What more can you want out of a book?

Overall a really excellent debut. Highly Recommended.

You can purchase The Doll Factory (Picador) here.

That’s it for today. Thanks so much for stopping by and happy reading!

o

 Born in Scotland, Elizabeth Macneal is a potter based in Limehouse, East London, working from a small studio at the bottom of her garden.  She read English Literature at Oxford University, before working in the City for several years. In 2017, she completed the Creative Writing MA at UEA where she was awarded the Malcolm Bradbury scholarship. The Doll Factory, Elizabeth’s first book, won the Caledonia Novel Award 2018.  

To learn more about the author of The Doll Factory, Elizabeth Macneal visit here.

Book To movie

Hello Bookish Friends,

Do you enjoy the classics?

How about Movie adaptations of Classical Books?

Here is a sneak peek of upcoming Movie, coming out this Winter .

Classical Books To Movies

Little Women (December 25, 2019)

Based on: Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
Directed by: Greta Gerwig

Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlen, Timothée Chalamet, Laura Dern, Bob Odenkirk, James Norton, Chris Cooper, Meryl Streep

Based on Louisa May Alcott’s 1868 novel, the trailer introduces the four March sisters — Meg (Emma Watson of “Harry Potter” fame), Jo (Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”), Beth (Eliza Scanlen, “Sharp Objects”), and Amy (Florence Pugh, “Midsommar”) — living in a cramped house Alcott loosely based on her own home in Concord, Mass.

In this new adaptation directed by Greta Gerwig (Ladybird) Saoirse Ronan plays Jo, Emma Watson as Meg, Florence Pugh as Amy and Eliza Scanlen as Beth. The rest of the cast is too good not to share including Timothée Chalamet as Laurie, Meryl Streep as Aunt March and James Norton as John Brooke. To add to the excitement, the score is being written by the genius Alexander Desplat. The film is set to be released this Christmas! –

This is now one of several adaptations of the book onto the screen so it will be interesting to see how it compares.

Little Women” will land in theaters on Dec. 25, 2019.

Click the Link: to watch the New Trailer
Little Woman 2019 Trailer

QOTD:: Have Read Little Woman?

When asked Why She Remained A Spinster? Mrs Alcott Reply Was….

Because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man.”

Louisa May Alcott’s grave in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts.

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for the novel Little Women, set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, and published in 1868. This novel is loosely based on her childhood experiences with her three sisters.

Alcott’s father established an experimental school and joined the Transcendental Club with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

Alcott’s early education included lessons from the naturalist Henry David Thoreau. She received the majority of her schooling from her father. She received some instruction also from writers and educators such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller, who were all family friends. She later described these early years in a newspaper sketch entitled “Transcendental Wild Oats”.

Alcott became an advocate for women’s suffrage and was the first woman to register to vote in Concord, Massachusetts, in a school board election.

“Some books are so

familiar that reading them is

like being home again”

—Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for the novel Little Women, set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, and published in 1868. This novel is loosely based on her childhood experiences with her three sisters.

Alcott was the daughter of noted transcendentalist and educator Amos Bronson Alcott and Abigail May Alcott. She shared a birthday with her father on November 29, 1832. In a letter to his brother-in-law, Samuel Joseph May, a noted abolitionist, her father wrote: “It is with great pleasure that I announce to you the birth of my second daughter…born about half-past 12 this morning, on my [33rd] birthday.” Though of New England heritage, she was born in Germantown, which is currently part of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was the second of four daughters: Anna Bronson Alcott was the eldest; Elizabeth Sewall Alcott and Abigail May Alcott were the two youngest. The family moved to Boston in 1834,[1] After the family moved to Massachusetts, Alcott’s father established an experimental school and joined the Transcendental Club with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

In 1840, after several setbacks with the school, the Alcott family moved to a cottage on 2 acres (8,100 m2) of land, situated along the Sudbury River in Concord, Massachusetts. The Alcott family moved to the Utopian Fruitlands community for a brief interval in 1843-1844 and then, after its collapse, to rented rooms and finally to a house in Concord purchased with her mother’s inheritance and financial help from Emerson. They moved into the home they named “Hillside” on April 1, 1845.

Alcott’s early education included lessons from the naturalist Henry David Thoreau. She received the majority of her schooling from her father. She received some instruction also from writers and educators such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller, who were all family friends. She later described these early years in a newspaper sketch entitled “Transcendental Wild Oats”. The sketch was reprinted in the volume Silver Pitchers (1876), which relates the family’s experiment in “plain living and high thinking” at Fruitlands.

As an adult, Alcott was an abolitionist and a feminist. In 1847, the family housed a fugitive slave for one week. In 1848, Alcott read and admired the “Declaration of Sentiments” published by the Seneca Falls Convention on women’s rights.

Poverty made it necessary for Alcott to go to work at an early age as an occasional teacher, seamstress, governess, domestic helper, and writer. Her first book was Flower Fables (1849), a selection of tales originally written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In 1860, Alcott began writing for the Atlantic Monthly. When the American Civil War broke out, she served as a nurse in the Union Hospital at Georgetown, D.C., for six weeks in 1862-1863. Her letters home – revised and published in the Commonwealth and collected as Hospital Sketches (1863, republished with additions in 1869) – garnered her first critical recognition for her observations and humor. Her novel Moods (1864), based on her own experience, was also promising.

She also wrote passionate, fiery novels and sensational stories under the nom de plume A. M. Barnard. Among these are A Long Fatal Love Chase and Pauline’s Passion and Punishment. Her protagonists for these tales are willful and relentless in their pursuit of their own aims, which often include revenge on those who have humiliated or thwarted them. Written in a style which was wildly popular at the time, these works achieved immediate commercial success.

Alcott produced wholesome stories for children also, and after their positive reception, she did not generally return to creating works for adults. Adult-oriented exceptions include the anonymous novelette A Modern Mephistopheles (1875), which attracted suspicion that it was written by Julian Hawthorne; and the semi-autobiographical tale Work (1873).

Literary success and later life

Alcott’s literary success arrived with the publication by the Roberts Brothers of the first part of Little Women: or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, (1868) a semi-autobiographical account of her childhood with her sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. Part two, or Part Second, also known as Good Wives, (1869) followed the March sisters into adulthood and their respective marriages. Little Men (1871) detailed Jo’s life at the Plumfield School that she founded with her husband Professor Bhaer at the conclusion of Part Two of Little Women. Jo’s Boys (1886) completed the “March Family Saga.”

In “Little Women,” Alcott based her heroine “Jo” on herself. But whereas Jo marries at the end of the story, Alcott remained single throughout her life. She explained her “spinsterhood” in an interview with Louise Chandler Moulton, “… because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man.” However, Alcott’s romance while in Europe with Ladislas Wisniewski, “Laddie,” was detailed in her journals but then deleted by Alcott herself before her death. Alcott identified Laddie as the model for Laurie in Little Women, and there is strong evidence this was the significant emotional relationship of her life.

In 1879 her younger sister, May, died. Alcott took in May’s daughter, Louisa May Nieriker (“Lulu”), who was two years old. The baby had been named after her aunt, but was nicknamed Lulu, whereas Louisa May’s nicknames were “Weed” and “Louy.”

In her later life, Alcott became an advocate for women’s suffrage and was the first woman to register to vote in Concord, Massachusetts, in a school board election.

Alcott, along with Elizabeth Stoddard, Rebecca Harding Davis, Anne Moncure Crane, and others, were part of a group of female authors during the Gilded Age who addressed women’s issues in a modern and candid manner. Their works were, as one newspaper columnist of the period commented, “among the decided ‘signs of the times’” (“Review 2 – No Title” from The Radical, May 1868, see References below).

Alcott, who continued to write until her death, suffered chronic health problems in her later years. She and her earliest biographers[citation needed] attributed her illness and death to mercury poisoning: during her American Civil War service, Alcott contracted typhoid fever and was treated with a compound containing mercury. Recent analysis of Alcott’s illness suggests that mercury poisoning was not the culprit. Alcott’s chronic health problems may be associated with an autoimmune disease, not acute mercury exposure. Moreover, a late portrait of Alcott shows on her cheeks rashes characteristic of lupus.[5][6] Alcott died of a stroke in Boston, on March 6, 1888, at age 55, two days after visiting her father’s deathbed. Her last words were “Is it not meningitis?”

The story of her life and career was told initially in Ednah D. Cheney’s Louisa May Alcott: Her Life, Letters and Journals (Boston, 1889) and then in Madeleine B. Stern’s seminal biography Louisa May Alcott (University of Oklahoma Press, 1950). In 2008, John Matteson won the Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his first book, Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father. Harriet Reisen’s biography, “Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women,” was published in 2009, and includes the most extensive primary source material (much discovered since Stern’s biography), including Madelon Bedell’s unpublished notes of interviews with Lulu before Lulu’s death.The children’s biography Invincible Louisa written by Cornelia Meigs received the Newbery Award in 1934 for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

Selected works

* The Inheritance (1849, unpublished until 1997)

* Flower Fables (1849)

* Hospital Sketches (1863)

* The Rose Family: A Fairy Tale (1864)

* Moods (1865, revised 1882)

* Morning-Glories and Other Stories (1867)

* The Mysterious Key and What It Opened (1867)

* Little Women or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy (1868)

* Three Proverb Stories (includes “Kitty’s Class Day”, “Aunt Kipp” and “Psyche’s Art”) (1868)

* A Strange Island, (1868)

* Part Second of Little Women, also known as “Good Wives” (1869)

* Perilous Play, (1869)

* An Old Fashioned Girl (1870)

* Will’s Wonder Book (1870)

* Aunt Jo’s Scrap-Bag (1872–1882)

* Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo’s Boys (1871)

* “Transcendental Wild Oats” (1873)

* Work: A Story of Experience (1873)

* Eight Cousins or The Aunt-Hill (1875)

* Beginning Again, Being a Continuation of Work (1875)

* Silver Pitchers, and Independence: A Centennial Love Story,” (1876)

* Rose in Bloom: A Sequel to Eight Cousins (1876)

* Under the Lilacs (1878)

* Jack and Jill: A Village Story (1880)

* The Candy Country (1885)

* Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out: A Sequel to “Little Men” (1886)

* Lulu’s Library (1886–1889)

* A Garland for Girls (1888)

* Comic Tragedies (1893 [posthumously])

As A. M. Barnard

* Behind a Mask, or a Woman’s Power (1866)

* The Abbot’s Ghost, or Maurice Treherne’s Temptation (1867)

* A Long Fatal Love Chase (1866 – first published 1995)

First published anonymously

* A Modern Mephistopheles (1877)

 

Have a wonderful Day

Blog Tour The Quest For The Crown Of Thorns

Hello there fellow book lovers!

Today, I am excited to be participating in the blog tour

The Quest for The Crown Of ThornsThe Quest for the Crown of Thorns
by Cynthia Ripley Miller

Publication Date: June 12, 2017
Knox Robinson Publishing
eBook & Paperback; 308 Pages

Series: The Long – Hair Saga, Book 2
Genre: Historical Fiction/Mystery

 #QuestfortheCrownofThorns #CynthiaRipleyMiller #HFVBTBlogTours 

 

AD 454. Three years after the Roman victory over Attila the Hun at Catalaunum, Arria Felix and Garic the Frank are married and enjoying life on Garic’s farm in northern Gaul (France). Their happy life is interrupted, when a cryptic message arrives from Rome, calling Arria home to her father, the esteemed Senator Felix. At Arria’s insistence, but against Garic’s better judgment, they leave at once.

Upon their arrival at Villa Solis, they are confronted with a brutal murder and the dangerous mission that awaits them. The fate of a profound and sacred object–Christ’s Crown of Thorns–rests in their hands. They must carry the holy relic to the safety of Constantinople, away from a corrupt emperor and old enemies determined to steal it for their own gain.

But an even greater force arises to derail their quest–a secret cult willing to commit any atrocity to capture the Crown of Thorns. And all the while, the gruesome murder and the conspiracy behind it haunt Arria’s thoughts.

Arria and Garic’s marital bonds are tested but forged as they partner together to fulfill one of history’s most challenging missions, The Quest for the Crown of Thorns.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Praise

“In this thriller, set in fifth-century Rome, rivals race to possess Christ’s crown of thorns. Ripley Miller (On the Edge of Sunrise 2015) astutely brings to life a Rome teetering precariously on the brink of collapse … The plot advances energetically, and the combination of political and romantic drama—spiritual as well—is rousing. The reader should be glad to have read this volume and eager for a third. Intelligent and artfully crafted historical fiction … Recommended.” -Kirkus Reviews

“From cover to cover a gripping read – in all senses of the word! Grips your interest and imagination, your held breath and your pounding heart! A thumping good novel!” -Helen Hollick USA Today bestselling author of the Sea Witch Voyages

“Forbidden love, a turbulent time period, and world-changing events combine to produce a real page-turner.” -India Edghill, author of Queenmaker, Wisdom’s Daughter, and Delilah.

“A passionate and intriguing take on the often overlooked clash of three brutal and powerful empires: the Romans, Franks, and Huns. A Compelling read!” -Stephanie Thornton, author of The Secret History and The Tiger Queens

“Readers will be absorbed by a setting of barbarian Gaul and the constancy of Arria’s and Garic’s destined love amid the strife of a dying Roman Empire.” -Albert Noyer, author of The Getorius and Arcadia Mysteries

“The Quest for the Crown of Thorns, is an elegant masterpiece of historical fiction. This book totally ensnared me in its clasps, and it did not release me until I had read it all. The attention to detail was exquisite The characterisation was sublime, and the romance was breathtakingly beautiful. I adored the world that Miller has created, as well as the characters in it. This is a sit-down and finish book and is one I would Highly Recommend.” -Mary Anne Yarde author of the Du Lac Chronicles

Don’t forget to enter the giveaway
and follow the blog tour

This book was received from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

The Quest For The Crown Of Thorns, is the second installment in Cynthia Ripley Miller, The Long Hair Saga

The Quest For The Crown Of Thorns, takes you on a suspense intriguing quest. Southern Europe AD 454 after the demise, Attila-the-Hun, Rome is teetering precariously on the brink of collapse. In a questionable turn of events, the Roman General Flavius Aetius dies. a precious relic is placed in the trusted hands of a senators daughter.

A dramatic and riveting storyline with a decaying Roman Empire, threatened by barbarians. The author masterly weaves historically events and a captivating quest to give readers and thrill ride of an adventure. Miller’s well researched and descriptive imagery is set with the backdrop of fifth century Roman. The book is brilliantly executed with superb narration, along with great character development. A plot fueled with intrigue and complex relationships. A thrilling, satisfying faced paced book with right amount of sensuality, that will keep you turning the pages as fast as can.

Once again Cynthia Miller delivers a compelling, intriguing, and well-written read here with absolutely fantastic characters that totally captivated and fascinated me. A masterpiece of historical fiction, rich in atmospheric descriptive details.

The novel is gripping and speedy paced, with vivid characters and enjoyable supportive cast, along with unwavering tension.

This is a fantastic read that left me with high anticipation for the next installment in this series.

About the Author

Cynthia Ripley Miller is a first generation Italian-American writer with a love for history, languages and books. She has lived, worked, and travelled in Europe, Africa, North America and the Caribbean. As a girl, she often wondered what it would be like to journey through time (she still does), yet knew, it could only be through the imagination and words of writers and their stories. Today, she writes to bring the past to life.

She holds two degrees and has taught history and teaches English. Her short fiction has appeared in the anthology Summer Tapestry, at Orchard Press Mysteries.com and The Scriptor. A Chanticleer International Chatelaine Award finalist for her novel, On the Edge of Sunrise, she has reviewed for UNRV Roman History, and blogs at Historical Happenings and Oddities: A Distant Focus

Cynthia has four children and lives with her husband, twin cats, Romulus and Remus, and Jessie, a German Shepherd, in a suburb of Chicago.

On the Edge of Sunrise is the first in the Long-Hair Saga; a series set in late ancient Rome and France and published by Knox Robinson Publishing. The second book in the series, The Quest for the Crown of Thorns, was released in June 2017.

For more information please visit Cynthia Ripley Miller’s website. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, August 14
Review at Gwendalyn’s Books

Thursday, August 15
Interview at Unabridged Chick
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Friday, August 16
Review at Hoover Book Reviews

Saturday, August 17
Feature at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Monday, August 19
Interview at Passages to the Past
Feature at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Tuesday, August 20
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Unabridged Chick

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away 1 paperback and 2 eBook copies of The Quest for the Crown of Thorns! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 20th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only. Ebooks are available for international entries.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Crown of Thorns – Tour #3

Book Tour and Author Interview

Hello and welcome to Gwendalyn’s Books,

Happy Tuesday to you! I hope your week will be is overflowing with great reads.

I am delighted to welcome a wonderful author to the blog today, CANDACE ROBB

#AConspiracyofWolves #CandaceRobb #HFVBTBlogTours

A Conspiracy of Wolves
by Candace Robb

Publication Date: August 1, 2019
Severn House/Crème de la Crime
Hardcover & eBook; 256 Pages

Series: Owen Archer, Book 11
Genre: Historical Mystery

 

Synopsis

When a prominent citizen is murdered, former Captain of the Guard Owen Archer is persuaded out of retirement to investigate in this gripping medieval mystery.

1374. When a member of one of York’s most prominent families is found dead in the woods, his throat torn out, rumours spread like wildfire that wolves are running loose throughout the city. Persuaded to investigate by the victim’s father, Owen Archer is convinced that a human killer is responsible. But before he can gather sufficient evidence to prove his case, a second body is discovered, stabbed to death. Is there a connection? What secrets are contained within the victim’s household? And what does apprentice healer Alisoun know that she’s not telling?

Teaming up with Geoffrey Chaucer, who is in York on a secret mission on behalf of Prince Edward, Owen’s enquiries will draw him headlong into a deadly conspiracy.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

GWENDALYN’S BOOKS INTERVIEW – CANDACE ROBB

 

1. If you could choose a book character to be for a day, who would it be and why?

One? That would be Magda Digby, the Riverwoman. She is so wise and comfortable in her own skin. How I created her I don’t know, but she’s become my guide. When life challenges me I find myself asking “What would Magda do?” I’d love to spend time in her stillness, living on her tidal island, in her house redolent with dried herbs and roots, the aroma of her tinctures and poultices. I’d love to walk the forest with her, seeing through her eyes, learning all she knows. She’s my first choice.

But if I could have a second choice, I’d be Lucie Wilton for a day—or a night, because…Owen Archer’s in her bed, you know?  

 

2. Which scene or chapter in the book is your favorite? Why?

 

I love how I shaped the first chapter of A Conspiracy of Wolves. I begin with Alisoun Ffulford, Magda Digby’s apprentice, feeling her way as a healer working solo while the Riverwoman is away. Alisoun’s so connected to the earth and such a complex young woman—I feel I finally caught that in the early scenes. And then I shift to Owen being bored to tears by Geoffrey Chaucer’s prattle as the latter composes poetry aloud while they ride back to York. That moment is hilariously vivid for me. Then the sharp contrast when Brother Michaelo and Bartolf Swann ride up, clearly in crisis. A bit of everything, even some Magda Digby.

 

3. Do you believe a book cover plays an important role in the selling process?

 I certainly think an eye-catching cover attracts readers in brick and mortar bookshops and libraries, particularly when piled face up on a table with many other books. That aspect might not be as important online, except in a publisher’s ads in which it might stand out. What is on the cover is just as important as the overall design—far too many historical novels written by women are marketed with covers that appeal to women, not men. That the majority of male readers shy away from anything that looks in anyway romantic is a fact the publishing industry can’t seem to learn. I was so happy to see Severn House’s cover for A Conspiracy of Wolves. I love it. The color, the design, the feel of it—I couldn’t be happier.

 

4. Which of your books took you the most time to write?

A Triple Knot, a novel about Joan of Kent, written under the pseudonym Emma Campion, took four years.  I had an absentee editor, pulled away from her fiction titles to work on celebrity books, so her response rate was glacial. She learned when I was several months away from delivering the manuscript that marketing demanded it be MUCH shorter than originally agreed. So the tempo of the book was all wrong, and, once we’d agreed that I would focus on Joan of Kent’s early marriage(s) and end the book shortly after she wed Prince Edward, I felt I needed to start over. An excellent editor, but spread far too thin.

 

5. Were you a young writer, a late bloomer, or something in between? What advice would you give to others who took up writing at a similar life phase?

 If you’re asking about when I began to write, my answer is early—the first poem my Dad saved and dated was written when I was 7. But I wasn’t published until my early 40s, so in that sense I’m a late bloomer—to my mind that was late. Advice? If spinning tales is as necessary to you as breathing, just keep doing it. And if you hope to reach an audience, submit your work!

 

6. Which of your books took you the most time to write?

Same question as #4

 

7. Is writing book series more challenging?

 I presume you mean is it more challenging than writing standalone novels? Not for me. Once the characters are well established they become collaborators, their skills and predilections providing ideas or ways into the story. Each series has its own rhythm, and the overall tone is fairly well set, although some stories are heavier than others. All of these decisions are made afresh for a standalone.

 

8. Do you enjoy theatre? Would you ever like one of your stories to be turned into a play?

 

I love theater, and, yes, I would love to experience one of my stories as theater. A play brings together a variety of talents and visions—the playwright’s script, the director’s take on the script, the actors’ interpretations of their roles, set design, costuming, lighting, any ambient music… What a thrill to see what they would bring to one of my books. It would be entirely different in their hands. I’d enjoy their insights.

 

9. Were your parents reading enthusiasts who gave you a push to be a reader as a kid?

 

My mother was a reader. Some of my happiest memories are our weekly trips to the library. We alternated between two in the neighborhood, for variety. When I’d exhausted the juvenile section she convinced the librarians to issue an adult card so I could read the classics. Mom put Jane Eyre into my hands, and Wuthering Heights. When I visited in her last years we’d sit side by side in the reading chairs in her living room, lost in our separate books, but interrupting each other now and then to share choice passages.

 

10. Do you need to be in a specific place or room to write, or you can just sit in the middle of a café full of people and write?

 

I need solitude in which to pace and think, and I prefer being in my office with all my reference works and music in the background—early music or Bach’s cello concertos.

 

11. What other projects are in the works?

 

My current focus is the Owen Archer series. I’m writing the 12th novel and playing with future plot concepts. Now and then I fiddle with ideas that have nothing to do with my deadline, just for a change of pace and the experience of writing something entirely different. Keeps me fresh! I don’t worry about whether it will ever amount to something I’ll complete, which in itself is liberating.

About the Author

I’m Candace Robb, a writer/historian engaged in creating fiction about the late middle ages with a large cast of characters with whom I enjoy spending my days. Two series, the Owen Archer mysteries and the Kate Clifford mysteries, are set in late medieval York. The Margaret Kerr trilogy is set in early 14th century Scotland, at the beginning of the Wars of Independence. Two standalone novels (published under pseudonym Emma Campion) expand on the lives of two women in the court of King Edward III who have fascinated me ever since I first encountered them in history and fiction.

I am a dreamer. Writing, gardening, walking, dancing, reading, being with friends—there’s always a dreaming element.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub

Blog Tour Schedule

Thursday, August 1
Review at Book Frolic
Excerpt at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Friday, August 2
Review at A Book Geek

Saturday, August 3
Feature at The Writing Desk

Monday, August 5
Feature at Book Addict Rambles

Tuesday, August 6
Excerpt at Broken Teepee
Review at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Wednesday, August 7
Interview at Bookish Rantings

Thursday, August 8
Guest Post at Reading the Past
Review at Hoover Book Reviews

Friday, August 9
Feature at I’m All About Books
Excerpt at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Saturday, August 10
Feature at Clarissa Reads it All

Sunday, August 11
Excerpt at A Darn Good Read

Monday, August 12
Excerpt at Just One More Chapter
Review & Interview at Gwendalyn’s Books

Tuesday, August 13
Review at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, August 14
Guest Post at Words and Peace
Excerpt at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Thursday, August 15
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Book Reviews from Canada

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a Hardcover copy of A Conspiracy of Wolves by Candace Robb! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Conspiracy of Wolves

Book Tour and Review

Hello Friends,

Welcome To My Stop On The

Conspiracy Of Wolves Book Tour

#aconspiracyofwolvesblogtour

#CandaceRobb #AConspiracyofWolves #historical #histfic #mystery #OwenArcher #hfvbt #hfvbtblogtours #bookblogger #bloggers #bookbloggers #england #blogtour #booknerd #bookworm #bibliophile #fiction #amreading #books #reading #booklovers #bookstagram #book #books

A Conspiracy of Wolves
by Candace Robb

Publication Date: August 1, 2019
Severn House/Crème de la Crime
Hardcover & eBook; 256 Pages

Series: Owen Archer, Book 11
Genre: Historical Mystery

 

 

When a prominent citizen is murdered, former Captain of the Guard Owen Archer is persuaded out of retirement to investigate in this gripping medieval mystery.

1374. When a member of one of York’s most prominent families is found dead in the woods, his throat torn out, rumours spread like wildfire that wolves are running loose throughout the city. Persuaded to investigate by the victim’s father, Owen Archer is convinced that a human killer is responsible. But before he can gather sufficient evidence to prove his case, a second body is discovered, stabbed to death. Is there a connection? What secrets are contained within the victim’s household? And what does apprentice healer Alisoun know that she’s not telling?

Teaming up with Geoffrey Chaucer, who is in York on a secret mission on behalf of Prince Edward, Owen’s enquiries will draw him headlong into a deadly conspiracy.

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

This book was received as an ARC from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

Thank you to Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and the Author,

Severn House, for providing me with a advanced digital copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.

Conspiracy of Wolves is the latest installment in the gripping series of Owen Archer mysteries. Set in the medieval 14th century York, Owen is still mourning the loss of his patron and facing uncertainty of his own future. Archer is called to investigate a horrific murder of one the members of a prominent family. Hoban Swann was brutally attacked and the father of the deceased has asked Owen to step in and use his expertise to investigate.

A rumor in the city, that vicious wolves are lurking in the woods and has caused the wounds and death of the recently departed. Owen teams up once again with Geoffrey Chaucer, who is in York on a secret mission on behalf of Prince Edward. Archer has a hunch after closer expectation that all is not what it seems to be. He most discover clues and a motive, but when another murder occurs. He knows their maybe a link between the two.

Once again Candace Robb manages to draw you in a thrilling mystery. This superb well-written read here with absolutely fantastic characters that totally captivated and fascinated me. The character relationship between Archer and Geoffrey Chaucer is well developed. Chaucer is always an amusing thorn in Owen’s side. You will enjoy their banter and the way the author has created a splendid dialogue between the two of them them. Another sub character worth noting is the healer apprentice, Allisoun who questions her instincts and is still learning to follow her inner voice.

Owen has lot on his plates with murders to solve, and a new Archbishop of York. Also there are new political intrigues and secrets for Owen to navigate through.

The author has created a plot that was intricate and kept me engaged from start to finish. The novel is both character driven and intriguing mystery. You will be completely vested in this unforgettable read.

Candace Robb writes some of the best a complex, suspenseful, atmospheric mysteries.

Conspiracy of Wolves is the eleventh novel in the Owen Archer series, but it can be read as a standalone.

About the Author

I’m Candace Robb, a writer/historian engaged in creating fiction about the late middle ages with a large cast of characters with whom I enjoy spending my days. Two series, the Owen Archer mysteries and the Kate Clifford mysteries, are set in late medieval York. The Margaret Kerr trilogy is set in early 14th century Scotland, at the beginning of the Wars of Independence. Two standalone novels (published under pseudonym Emma Campion) expand on the lives of two women in the court of King Edward III who have fascinated me ever since I first encountered them in history and fiction.

I am a dreamer. Writing, gardening, walking, dancing, reading, being with friends—there’s always a dreaming element.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub

Blog Tour Schedule

Thursday, August 1
Review at Book Frolic
Excerpt at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Friday, August 2
Review at A Book Geek.

Saturday, August 3
Feature at The Writing Desk

Monday, August 5
Feature at Book Addict Rambles

Tuesday, August 6
Excerpt at Broken Teepee
Review at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Wednesday, August 7
Interview at Bookish Rantings

Thursday, August 8
Guest Post at Reading the Past
Review at Hoover Book Reviews

Friday, August 9
Feature at I’m All About Books
Excerpt at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Saturday, August 10
Feature at Clarissa Reads it All

Sunday, August 11
Excerpt at A Darn Good Read

Monday, August 12
Excerpt at Just One More Chapter
Review & Interview at Gwendalyn’s Books

Tuesday, August 13
Review at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, August 14
Guest Post at Words and Peace
Excerpt at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Thursday, August 15
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Book Reviews from Canada

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a Hardcover copy of A Conspiracy of Wolves by Candace Robb! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 15th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Conspiracy of Wolves

Blog Tour and Giveaway

Hello Bookish Friends,

Today is the first stop on this very anticipated Book Tour and Giveaway!

#TheSorcerersWhore #SamanthaGrosser #HFVBTBlogTours

The Sorcerer’s Whore
by Samantha Grosser

Publication Date: July 16, 2019
eBook: 330 Pages

Series: Pages of Darkness, #2
Genre: Historical Fiction/Historical Fantasy

 

A cursed child, a dangerous path, and a price to pay…

Six-fingered Mary Sparrow dreams of escape from the brothel that is the only world she knows. But when a mysterious old man drives her friend to madness, she begins to fear for her life.

Toby Chyrche also hopes for a better future, away from the confines of the tailor’s shop where it seems his fate is set in stone. So when a chance meeting with an old man at the brothel offers him a different path, he is only too eager to accept. Then the discovery of an ancient book of magic throws a new and shocking light onto the past – his mother had a brother, and that brother was a witch.

As the old man’s shadow over Bankside lengthens, Mary is drawn into the growing web of darkness. Unable to escape its reach, she turns to Toby for help. But Toby has daemons of his own to face. Will possession of the book be enough to protect them from the old man’s power? And what price will they have to pay for victory?

For the Sorcerer’s Whore, nothing is as it seems …

Amazon US | Amazon UK | iBooks | Kobo | Nook

This book was received as an ARC from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

England 1632 

25 years have passed since the first fateful production of Macbeth, and the forces of evil are about to be reawoken.

The Sorcerer’s Whore, is Samantha Grossers second book in the Pages of Darkness Series. A wickedly delightful, gripping and immersive tale that totally absorbed me into its hauntingly dark characters.

The setting takes place 25 years after Shakespeare’s Witch. The book reintroduces some of the characters from the first installment, and introduces us to some new characters as well.

Six-fingered Mary Sparrow dreams of escaping from her line of work in Bankside, London. In her lot in life there is no room for real love. She is confused and torn by unsettling emotions she has for a new handsome client. Living in the stews of Cardinal Cap is the only world she knows, it’s a place of distractions and debauchery. Survival is the main priority, and Mary must keep her wits about her.

Dark plans from a mysterious older gentleman may have her questioning her safety and fearing for life.

Toby Chyrche, also hopes and dreams for a better future, after the death of his father, dark shocking secrets come to light.

A chance meeting with an older gentleman at a brothel offers Toby a different journey in life. One he is only too eager to accept, which takes him down a dark pathway. Nothing is what it seems, a discovery of an old book of magic which once was lost, and now found, along with past revelations sets events in motion in this well layered novel.

In this dramatic sweeping plot, I was immediately drawn in and I devoured every single page of this wickedly entertaining book. Once I started reading I was hooked and engaged in this creative storyline. It wasn’t an easy task to pull away from the book.

This intense and riveting novel, has well developed characters and an enjoyable storyline. The authors writing had me hooked from the very first chapter.

Grossers, intricately plots a character driven romance that fights poignancy through the complex conflicts of fate. Dark seductive magic drives the story forward with several interesting twists that make the ending all the more anticipated and satisfying. I was immediately pulled into the story, totally intrigued by the premise, and fully absorbed in this suspenseful page-turner.

What really stood out for me was how the author included the religious strife that was coming to head and political drama it caused in the area around Bankside London with Puritan belief system. It caused a climactic change in the area that once allowed prostitution and the creativeness the theater brought with it. Puritan beliefs that stifled and frighten the population to the living conditions and strict code of conduct that restricted woman into believing that sexuality was only for procreation for children and anything else was considered evil and that of satan and sinful. The Authors creative and atmospheric details that captures the turbulent times of 1632

A Seductive, and wickedly alluring gritty tale that was such an irresistible read.

I am looking forward to the next installment in this memorizing dark a provocative and alluring series.

About the Author

Historical fiction author Samantha Grosser originally hails from England, but now lives on the sunny Northern Beaches of Sydney with her husband, son and a very small dog called Livvy.

Combining a lifelong love of history with a compulsion to write that dates from childhood, Samantha is now bringing her passion for telling compelling stories to the world.

Samantha has an Honours Degree in English Literature and taught English for many years in Asia and Australia. She is the author of wartime dramas Another Time and Place and The Officer’s Affair, and The King James Men, set during the turbulent early years of 17th Century.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | BookBub | Pinterest | Instagram

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, August 12
Review at Gwendalyn’s Books

Wednesday, August 14
Review at Passages to the Past

Sunday, August 18
Feature at Diana_bibliophile

Monday, August 19
Review at Pencils & Pages

Tuesday, August 20
Review at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Thursday, August 22
Review at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away one eBook and one paperback copy of The Sorcerer’s Whore! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 22nd. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to the US & UK only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

Sorcerer’s Whore

-A little Historical facts-

The name Cardinal’s Hat (or Cap),

for a house on the site of the present No. 49, Bankside, and for the narrow alley which runs down beside it,

Photo taken from the, British History Online is a digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources for the history of Britain and Ireland, with a primary focus on the period between 1300 and 1800. We aim to support the learning, teaching and research of our users from around the world.

BHO was founded by the Institute of Historical Research and the History of Parliament Trust in 2003.

Photo from British History Online

Book Tour Everything I Knew To Be True

Hi book-lovers! And welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Everything I Knew to Be True, hosted by YA Bound Book Tours!

This was without a doubt a fantastic and incredibly powerful YA debut, and I’m beyond excited to be introducing this to you guys!

So, without any further adieu, scroll down for book + author info, purchase info and the chance to win a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

Everything I Knew to be True

by Rayna York

Genre: YA Contemporary Fiction

Release Date: May 12th 2019

Warning: Although this book is classified as Young Adult, I recommended it for mature readers due to explicit language.

Purchase link :

https://linktr.ee/rayna.york

Synopsis

It was never easy for Cassie and her mother, struggling to make ends meet in their tiny apartment in The

Bronx, but they had each other and that was enough. When her mother dies suddenly from an aggressive form

of cancer, Cassie is forced to finish high school in California while living with the wealthy family of her

mother’s closest friend—a women she never knew existed.

Living with the Stantons is the complete opposite of what she’s used to—the massive house, a father figure,

and Cody, the spoiled, insanely good-looking son with the bedroom across the hall.

Broken with grief and struggling to fit in, Cassie meets Mila, a female powerhouse that helps her cope with a

hidden past, the overwhelming present, and a shared experience no one should have to endure—a nightmare

they both thought was over.

Excerpt One

I stare in numb silence at my mother’s casket, waiting to be lowered into its final resting place.

Everything happened so fast, I’ve hardly had a chance to process it all.

A spilt second image of Mom sitting at our tiny kitchen table flashes through my mind—

that’s where we’d catch up on the daily grind. She had so many outrageous customers, Maria’s antics, her daily goof-ups, but I guess that comes with being a waitress for thirteen years.

I know she tried hard to hide it from me—I can see that now. It started with her being tired all the time and then throwing up constantly—the weight loss was staggering. When she finally went to the doctor, they diagnosed her with stage IV pancreatic cancer.

They gave her three to six weeks to live. Her name was Allora, and I still can’t believe she’s gone.

“Cassie?” Roxanne gently places a hand on my shoulder. “Are you ready?” I look around, momentarily confused. There were so many people here. Where did they go?

I guess I’ve been pretty out of it the last couple of days, which is understandable considering. I swallow hard against the emotional lump that’s jammed in my throat and tell her I need another minute.

“Okay,” she replies solemnly. “I’ll wait for you by the car. Take your time.”

There’s only a marker now. I guess the headstone comes later; at least that’s what they tell me.

I leave for California tonight. Mom made arrangements for me to live with her closest friend—a person I never even knew existed until two weeks ago. I’d always assumed that Mom had grown up in New York—it’s where her parents lived before they died.

Apparently, I was wrong. I begged her to let me stay here with Luigi and Maria—they’re like family. At least then some things would have remained the same. Instead, she insisted I live with Roxanne and her family.

We drive back to the apartment so I can get my stuff. “I won’t be long,” I tell Roxanne, leaving her at the door looking bewildered. I feel bad being thrust on her like this. She doesn’t even know me, and now I’m going to live with her. She seems fine with it, but still.

I can’t believe how empty the place seems. Yeah, all our stuff’s gone, but it’s more than that. Mom was my best friend—my only friend. She made this dinky little hole-in-the-wall a home, made every day special no matter how hard things got—and there were some pretty tough times.

How am I going to start over without her?

I step in to the tiny sunroom and stare out one of the many windows with my arms wrapped tightly around me. Mom surprised me on my thirteenth birthday when she turned it into an art studio. She built shelves and lined them with jars of paintbrushes, pens, and pencils. She even placed an easel in the corner next to the wall of windows, with blank canvases stacked next to it. I know it cost her a lot of money—money we didn’t have to spare—but it was an amazing gift.

Art was everything to me.

My Thoughts

Rayna York, tackles the difficult subjects of death, alcoholism, and teen sexual abuse with effectiveness and polished skill. I highly recommend this excellent book for young adults and parents! One of my top picks for 2019.

After losing her mother, Cassie is forced to leave the only life she’s ever known and travel across the country to live with her mother’s close friend, a women Cassie only recently met. It doesn’t take long for Cassie to realize she didn’t really know her mom like she thought she did.

Secrets come to light and much of what she believed was a lie.

Cassie is full of bitterness and resentment and is struggling with inner turmoil.

Dealing with a new high school and the superficial classmates their eventual Chaos erupts in Cassie Life. Cassie struggles to let anyone get close to her. Will she be able to overcome her emotions before she pushes everyone away, including those who genuinely care?

The author has written a captivating storyline has a with a slow burn romance, blossoming friendship, and a twist that will keep glued to the pages.

The characters are vibrant and well developed and I found myself deeply invested in their lives and the decisions they make.

Everything I Knew to be True is definitely a must read for teens and fans of young adult stories. I recommend picking up a copy, and read this book 📖

“No one at school will say anything against him—fear of retribution and all. No one wants to be on the wrong side of popular.

Enjoyable sentimental contemporary romance with a little twist makes for a fast paced and fun read.

Giveaway Link

a Rafflecopter
giveaway

About the Author 

About the Author
Rayna York grew up with hippie parents that liked to adventure, so being the new kid was always a challenge. Where change was the norm, books were her constant–a way to escape. As an adult, many careers came and went, but writing has always been her passion. Everything I knew to be true is her first published novel.

Blog Tour Schedule

August 5th
Bookish Rantings www.bookishrantings.wordpress.com Promo Post
Paulette’s Papers https://paulettespapers.com/ Promo Post
Struck by Stories https://www.struckbystories.com Review
Amie’s Book Reviews http://Amiesbookreviews.wordpress.com Review
Shannon Muir, Author – Infinite House of Books https://www.shannon-muir.com Promo Post
August 6th
Happily, Hedy happilyhedy.wordpress.com Promo Post
The Tired Buyer www.thetiredbuyer.wordpress.com Promo Post
Buried Under Books https://cncbooksblog.wordpress.com Review
Lucy Turns Pages lucyturnspages.co.uk Promo Post
Becky on Books https://beckymmoe.com Promo Post
August 7th
For the Love of KidLit www.jennifermaryg.com Promo Post
Never Too Many To Read  www.never2many2read.blogspot.com Review
The Eclectic Review https://eclecticreview.com Review
Paper Ink & Lizard www.paperinklizard.wordpress.com Promo Post
August 8th
emily the book nerd https://emilythebooknerdxo.blogspot.com/ Promo Post
Miss Riki http://missriki.com Review
The Reading Life thereadinglifeblog.com Promo Post
Books and Sassy Lilacs https://booksandsassylilacs.com Review
Coffee, Dogs & Books https://coffeedogsandbooks.wordpress.com/ Review
August 9th
Gwendalyn_books_ http://gwendalynbooks.wordpress.com/ Review
The Phantom Paragrapher www.thephantomparagrapher.blogspot.com Review
YA/NA  Book Divas  www.yabookdivas.com  Promo Post
Teatime and Books http://www.teatimeandbooks76.blogspot.com Promo Post
Adventures in Writing http://thhernandez.com/ Review
The Avid Reader http://the-avidreader.blogspot.com Promo Post
Treestand Book Reviews https://treestandbookreviews.wordpress.com Review

No Stone Unturned

Book Tour And Guest Post

Hello Lovelies,

Hello my lovely friends! Today I have the huge pleasure to partnered with the Incredible author Pam Lecky and HFVBT

So grab yourself you favorite Cuppa coffee or tea and let me introduce you to our Heroine the very precocious Mrs Lucy Lawrence…

*Don’t forget to enter for a chance to win one of two copies of the book*

#NoStoneUnturned #PamLecky #HFVBTBlogTours @pamlecky @hfvbt #Giveaway

Publication Date: June 28, 2019
Paper BookPages: 286

Series: The Lucy Lawrence Mysteries, Book 1
Genre: Historical Mystery

No Stone Unturned

By Pam Lecky

Synopsis

A suspicious death, stolen gems, and an unclaimed reward: who will be the victor in a deadly game of cat and mouse?

London October 1886: Trapped in a troubled marriage, Lucy Lawrence is ripe for an adventure. But when she meets the enigmatic Phineas Stone, over the body of her husband in the mortuary, her world begins to fall apart.

When her late husband’s secrets spill from the grave, and her life is threatened by the leader of London’s most notorious gang, Lucy must find the strength to rise to the challenge. But who can she trust and how is she to stay out of the murderous clutches of London’s most dangerous criminal?

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My Review

This book was received as an ARC from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

No Stone Unturned is the first book in my new series, The Lucy Lawrence Mysteries, perfectly set in Victorian London, and the wilds of Yorkshire in the north of England. The story surrounds a suspicious death of Lucy Lawrence’s husband, which has been made to look like an unfortunate accident, some stolen sapphires belonging to a Kashmiri maharajah, Lucy becomes embroiled by association of her late husband to some ruthless underworld people and their criminal activities. Can she outsmart a London crime lord. She is left almost homeless without much of allowance left to live on by her late husband. Will she be able to put her trust in the dashing Mr Phineas Stone.

Lucy, has been estranged from her family and society when she eloped with a dashing man. Finding herself suddenly widowed and the circumstances surrounding the death of her late husband Charlie. Strong willed she struggles with social class and gender restrictions of the Victorian age, where strict rules applied to woman.

This a thrilling book that keeps you on the edge of your seat with unexpected twist. This intriguing mystery of cat and mouse will keep you fully your invested in its heart stopping adventures chases. The authors ability to recreate Victorian England is absolutely astonishing. Descriptive scenes with detailed imagery that you are completely immersed as you are dragged right along with our heroine Lucy Lawerence as she discover clues in this tension filled storyline.

A brilliantly executed plot that with each scene richly atmospheric that will transport to Victorian period of England with a creative blend of Dorothy L Sayers and PD James styles. I absolutely loved this book and its strong reliance on female friendship.

Lucy and her maid Mary relationship was so enjoyable that it was by far my favorite in book. Mary’s character development as the book progress was superb. All the sub characters were fascinating as was her friend Judith, and lovable uncle Giles.

Pam Lackey new book is a perfect page turner, with all the classical elements that make for an exquisite historical thrill ride of a mystery.

I am new fan of Pam Lackey and I am looking forward to the next installment in this series titled, Footprints in the Sand, and is set in Egypt

Guest Post

Death by Coffin!
For any lover of the Victorian era, London’s most famous cemeteries hold endless fascination. My favourites are Highgate and Kensal Green with their eerie Gothic and Neo-classical architecture. The Victorian obsession with death, the after-life and spiritualism sparked the trend for highly decorated tombs and crypts. Heartbreaking inscriptions, lichen-encrusted headstones and mournful statuary lend a melancholy air to these places. It’s no wonder they feature so much in Gothic fiction. As I researched my latest novel, No Stone Unturned, I delved a little deeper into the history.
Both cemeteries were built in response to London’s population explosion in the early part of the 19th century which had resulted in graveyards being crammed in between shops and houses with little control over the number of corpses being interred. The smell these sites generated was described as terrible.
With public health at risk, Parliament passed a statute for seven new private cemeteries to be opened in the countryside around the city boundary. These included Highgate and Kensal Green.
Highgate Cemetery
Dan Bridge
Highgate is probably the most famous of all the Gothic cemeteries. In May 1839, it was dedicated to St James by the Lord Bishop of London. Of the seventeen acres, fifteen were consecrated for members of the Church of England and the remaining two acres were set aside for ‘Dissenters’ (everyone else). Elizabeth Jackson, aged thirty-six, was the first ever burial in Highgate in May 1839.
London’s wealthy invested heavily in the cemetery due to its amazing views over London (highest point 375 feet above sea level) and its unique architecture and landscaping.
Kensal Green Cemetery
Photo Credit: Kraft_Stoff
“For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen; Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green.” G.K. Chesterton’s poem The Rolling English Road.
Kensal Green was opened by the Bishop of London on 24th January 1833 and was the first commercial cemetery in London. The first burial was the same month.
A competition for the design of the cemetery was held and the winning entry was for a Gothic style, however, the Chairman of the General Cemetery Company had other ideas. The final design was Neo-classical. As in Highgate, the burial grounds were divided up between the Church of England and the Dissenters. 
Illustrated Police News
An Unfortunate Death!
A pallbearer by the name of Henry Taylor met a tragic end in Kensal Green. While carrying a coffin, he missed his footing and stumbled. His fellow pallbearers let go of the coffin which fell on poor Henry, killing him instantly.
Here is the description from The Illustrated Police News, November 1872:
“KILLED BY COFFIN. Dr. Lancaster held an inquest Saturday evening at the University College Hospital, London, on the body Henry Taylor, aged 60. The evidence of E. J. Heading, undertaker’s foreman, and others showed that on the 19th inst. deceased, with others, was engaged at a funeral at Kensal-Green Cemetery. The Church service having been finished, the coffin and mourners proceeded in coaches towards the place of burial. The day being damp, the foreman directed the coaches with the mourners to proceed to the grave by the foot-way, and the hearse across the grass towards a grave-digger, who was motioning the nearest way. The coffin was moved from the hearse and being carried down a path only three feet six wide, by six bearers, when orders were given to turn, so that the coffin, which was what is known in the trade as a four pound leaden one, should head first. While the men were changing, it is supposed that deceased caught his foot against a side stone and stumbled; the other bearers, to save themselves, let the coffin go, and it fell with great force on to deceased, fracturing his jaws and ribs. The greatest confusion was created among the mourners who witnessed the accident, and the widow of the person about to be buried nearly went into hysterics. Further assistance having been procured the burial service was proceeded with, while deceased was conveyed to a surgery, and ultimately to the above mentioned hospital, where he expired on the 24th inst. The jury recommended that straps should be placed round coffins, which would tend to prevent such accidents. Verdict—accidental death. “
Sadly, although Henry lost his life in Kensal Green, it appears he was not buried there.
♦♦♦
In No Stone Unturned, my heroine Lucy Lawrence buries her husband Charlie in Kensal Green. A mysterious mourner at the graveside soon turns her life upside-down as Charlie’s dirty secrets spill from the grave …
No Stone Unturned is the first book in the Lucy Lawrence Mystery Series.

A suspicious death, stolen gems and an unclaimed reward; who will be the victor in a deadly game of cat and mouse?

London October 1886: Trapped in a troubled marriage, Lucy Lawrence is ripe for an adventure. But when she meets the enigmatic Phineas Stone, over the body of her husband in the mortuary, her world begins to fall apart.

When her late husband’s secrets spill from the grave and her life is threatened by the leader of London’s most notorious gang, Lucy must find the strength to rise to the challenge. But who can she trust and how is she to stay out of the murderous clutches of London’s most dangerous criminal?

Amazon Buy Link

 

About the Author

Pam is an Irish writer of historical fiction with a particular love of the late Victorian era and early 20th century. She is fascinated by all things 19th century, from food and clothes to architecture and social history. She is patiently awaiting the invention of time travel, but in the meantime, indulges her love of the past by writing about it.

Her debut novel, The Bowes Inheritance, was awarded the BRAG Medallion in 2017. It was shortlisted for the Carousel Aware Prize 2016; made ‘Editor’s Choice’ by the Historical Novel Society; long-listed for the Historical Novel Society 2016 Indie Award; and chosen as a Discovered Diamond in February 2017.

In April 2018, Pam published an anthology of some previously published short reads, along with some new work. Her collection of short stories is entitled, Past Imperfect, and features stories set in such diverse settings as WW1 Dublin, the sinking of the Lusitania and a lonely haunted lighthouse.

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Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, August 5
Review & Interview at Passages to the Past

Tuesday, August 6
Review at Books In Their Natural Habitat

Wednesday, August 7
Excerpt at Words and Peace
Guest Post at Short Books and Scribes

Thursday, August 8
Review & Guest Post at Gwendalyn_Books_

Friday, August 9
Review at Bibliophile Reviews

Sunday, August 11
Review at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Monday, August 12
Feature at Coffee and Ink
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away two copies of No Stone Unturned by Pam Lecky! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

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– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 12th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
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No Stone Unturned

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