The Rift

Hey Book Nerds!

Welcome to my stop on THE RIFT by Rachael Craw Official Blog Tour. Read my review and don’t forget to enter the Giveaway

TOUR SCHEDULE:
http://www.jeanbooknerd.com/2019/07/the-rift-by-rachael-craw.html

Print Length: 368 pages
Publisher:
Candlewick Press (October 8, 2019)
Publication Date: October 8, 2019
Language: English

ISBN1536211281/9781536211283
Young Adult Novel/Hardback



Praise for THE RIFT

“Thrilling … A fresh and original story; a standout in the fantasy genre. The romance between Cal and Meg blends envy, desire and uncertainty with a potent authenticity. Written with a sparse lovely poetry, The Rift demands an immersion that is intoxicating. I can’t recommend this enough.” ―Isabelle Carmody, author of The Obernewtyn Chronicles and The Gathering

“Gripping, brutal, tender. You won’t be able to put this book down.” ―Michael Pryor, author of The Laws Of Magic series and Gap Year in Ghost Town.

“Beautiful, dark and deliciously tense – an astonishing world that will hold you in its finely wrought claws.” ―Alison Goodman, author of the Lady Helen series and the Eon series.

“Masterful and brilliant! Beautiful world building, stunning writing, a cracking plot, perfectly paced and hot romantic tension. Craw has outdone herself.” ―Fleur Ferris, best-selling author of Risk, Black, Wreck and Found

Storylines Notable Book Award, 2019
Finalist, New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults, 2019

As corporate greed is pitted against supernatural forces, two young friends must try to protect the precious Old Herd — and their island itself.

For generations, the rangers of Black Water Island have guarded the Old Herd against the horrors released by the Rift. And Cal West, an apprentice ranger, fights daily to prove he belongs within their ranks. But even greater challenges await with the return of his childhood friend Meg Archer and the onset of a new threat that not even the rangers are prepared for. Now Meg and Cal, while struggling with their mutual attraction, must face their darkest fears to save the island from disaster. In a possible near future where Big Pharma is pitted against ancient traditions and the supernatural, Rachael Craw’s gripping and brutal tale, inspired by Greek mythology, will immerse readers and leave them intoxicated by its richly imagined world.


You can purchase The Rift at the following Retailers:   
     

This book was received from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

When the Rift opens, death follows

Rachael Craw, has created an impressive atmospheric read that will transport you to the island, with imaginative visuals and meticulously details. A fierce and compelling magical realism storyline within a richly textured world. The Rift, is a riveting themed ya fantasy that weaves environmental conservation elements into an urban mythology. Rachael Craw’s The Rift, has stellar writing, a perfection of a survival adventure, In twined with romance and perfectly placed humor.

A stunning backdrop to the plot line, Black Water Island is immersed in tradition, a millennia since The Rift emerged causing the mountain to fracture. The residents of Black Water are isolated from the mainland, For generations, the Rangers of Black Water Island have guarded the Old Herd against horrors released by the Rift.

The Rift by Rachael Craw is told from two different narration between the two protagonists. That of Cal West, an apprentice Ranger with rare abilities living on Blackwater Island and responsible for the safety of an ancient herd of deer, And Meg Archer, the daughter of the Master Ranger swept away to the mainland by her mother to live a “normal life” after a terrible childhood accident. Meg is finely returning to the island after being gone for years.

The two must navigate their way through their growing attraction for one another all while facing their fears to save the island and the Old Herd from disaster.

Beautifully developed, the story line had the perfect blend of ya adventure and romance. Thrown together with the perfect amount of earthly atmospheric magic makes for an incredible read.

Photo Content from Rachael Craw

Rachael Craw began her working life as an English teacher after completing a degree in Classical Studies and Drama at the University of Canterbury. She dabbled in acting, directing and writing for amateur theatre productions and small independent film ventures. Her passion for dialogue and characterisation finally led to long-form writing with the Spark series. Rachael’s enthusiasm for classical heroes, teen angst and popular culture informs much of her creative process. She enjoys small town life teaching, writing and mentoring at the top of the South Island of New Zealand where she lives with her husband and three daughters.


  
WEEK ONE
OCTOBER 7th MONDAY JeanBookNerd INTERVIEW
OCTOBER 8th TUESDAY Casia’s Corner REVIEW
OCTOBER 9th WEDNESDAY Movies, Shows, & Books TENS LIST
OCTOBER 10th THURSDAY BookHounds YA INTERVIEW 
OCTOBER 10th THURSDAY Sabrina’s Paranormal Palace REVIEW
OCTOBER 11th FRIDAY TTC Books and More EXCERPT
OCTOBER 11th FRIDAY Wonder Struck REVIEW
WEEK TWO
OCTOBER 14th MONDAY Nay’s Pink Bookshelf INTERVIEW
OCTOBER 15th TUESDAY Crossroad Reviews REVIEW 
OCTOBER 16th WEDNESDAY Gwendalyn’s Books REVIEW
OCTOBER 17th THURSDAY A Dream Within A Dream REVIEW & EXCERPT
OCTOBER 17th THURSDAY The Moonlight Library REVIEW & GUEST POST 
OCTOBER 18th FRIDAY Insane About Books REVIEW 
OCTOBER 18th FRIDAY On My Bookshelf REVIEW & EXCERPT

*JBN is not responsible for Lost or Damaged Books in your Nerdy Mail Box*

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ENDS: OCTOBER 28, 2019

The Batter’s Box

Book Tour and Giveaway

The Batter’s Box
by Andy Kutler

Publication Date: March 12, 2019
Warriors Publishing Group
Hardcover, Paperback, eBook

Genre: Historical Fiction

 #TheBattersBox #AndyKutler #HFVBTBlogTours 

 

In 1946, a returning World War II veteran is determined to reclaim his place among professional baseball’s upper echelon and win back the woman he once fell for. Two months into the new season, at the top of his game, he abandons his team, casting aside his fame and riches and vanishing forever from the public eye. What drives a man to walk away from everything he cherishes, never to be heard from again?

The Batter’s Box follows the path of Will Jamison, a star player with the Washington Senators who enlists in the U.S. Army following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. When the war ends, Jamison returns to Washington, a decorated hero tormented by deep emotional scars. Burdened with a crushing guilt and harrowing memories he cannot escape, Jamison’s life is consumed by an explosive temper, sleepless nights, and a gradual descent into alcoholism. Will he continue, alone with his anguish and misery? Or will he level with those around him, including the woman he loves, and seek the professional care he desperately needs, even at the risk of exposing his most closely guarded secrets?

Amazon | Barnes and Noble | IndieBound

 

Praise

“We remember World War II as ‘the Good War, ‘ when right and wrong seemed so clear. We won, they lost, and our guys came home as heroes. But as gifted author Andy Kutler tells us in THE BATTER’S BOX, mortal combat is anything but good, heroism comes with a horrific price, and some of the most tragic wounds don’t bleed — and don’t go away. If you want to know what really happened at Bastogne in the terrible winter of 1944, read this powerful, haunting book.” — Daniel P. Bolger, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army (Ret.), author of Our Year of War: Two Brothers, Vietnam, and a Nation Divided

“Andy Kutler has the eyes and ears of combat soldiers and the heart of those who love them. The horror, courage, and camaraderie of battle rivals the grit of Once an Eagle, while the poignant authenticity of Will Jamison’s struggles with his hidden wounds highlight that, for many, the impact of war lingers far past the last shots of battle. THE BATTER’S BOX is a superb work of historical fiction that carries important lessons for today.” — William E. Rapp, Major General, U.S. Army (Ret.), Former Commandant, U.S. Army War College, and Commandant of Cadets, U.S. Military Academy

The Batter’s Box is a riveting read. It is a love story and a war story and a novel with far more truth than fiction. I’m a psychiatrist specializing in treating men and women with post-traumatic stress disorder. If you love someone with that invisible wound, read this book. If you are curious and concerned about the condition, read this book. Most survivors of profound trauma lack a language to convey their life stories because those stories include the unspeakable. When the hero of this compelling novel speaks, we listen, we learn and we are transformed. If you are currently struggling with the impact of major trauma, reading passages here may be disturbing and ‘triggering.’ But I believe it is worth the risk because this book affirms your reality and your dignity.” –Frank M. Ochberg, MD, Former Associate Director, National Institute of Mental Health

“Historical fiction, if it reflects careful scholarship, is a powerful tool in the hands of a gifted writer, and can deepen our understanding of real events and people. Andy Kutler’s THE BATTER’S BOX offers an impressive addition to World War II literature, bringing fresh attention to the adjustment struggle faced by so many returning war veterans. Kutler’s depiction of one of the more heroic small-unit engagements in US Army history is both compelling and long overdue.” — Gordon H. “Nick” Mueller, President & CEO Emeritus, The National WWII Museum

This book was received as an ARC from the Author and the Publisher, In exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. Thank you to Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and the Author, Andy Kutler.

Andy Kutler’s THE BATTER’S BOX, is a unforgettable novel about a star baseball athlete, as he transition from All-Star baseball player to a soldier serving in the Us military. To a struggling veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, trying to adapt to to civilian life. A story of hopes hopes and dreams, sacrifice, and ultimately love. In Andy Kutler new novel, we meet the man protagonist, Will Jamison. A baseball player during the time that our men and women had put their dreams and aspirations aside, and serve our country. Through Jamison fictional narrative voice, you are taken from our countries national pastime, to front and center in his harrowing experience in the Second World War. The authors detailed descriptions of both pro baseball, and the Battle of the Bulge, kept me on the edge of my seat in fast moving storyline. The pace was brisk and vividly rendered, along with rich descriptive details with period details. The main characters voice and the depth of his challenges will give an insight to struggles of a soldiers struggle long after the war is over. The authors captures the human soul in this moving and compelling book. Kutler, provides us a glimpse of all that suffer through the aftermath of surviving combat, to returning home emotionally torn. I loved the overall premise of the novel, and the quick pace kept me engaged. What immediately grabbed my attention in this story was the complexity of the characters. All characters were raw, honest, and flawed. Andy Kutler, masterly gives the reader with an introspective view of how war changes those involved forever, and how their struggles continues for the veterans long after the war is over. Jamison is changed forever, he struggles through the emotional damages brought on by the lingering effects of the war. He finds love along the way, and most overcome his own demons and find redemption while putting back together his life.

The Batter’s Box is a heartbreaking, heartwarming hopeful story that explores love, loss, hardship, sacrifice and the relationships that bond people together. A powerful memorable novel absorbing novel, this is one of those books that will stay with me for a long time.

Photo taken from authors website:

About the Author

Andy Kutler is a writer living in Arlington, Virginia. His debut novel, The Other Side of Life, was awarded a Bronze Medal from the Independent Publishers Book Awards, and Honorable Mention from Foreword Reviews’ INDIEFAB Awards. He has also authored a number of columns for the Huffington Post and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, and spent more than a quarter century in public service, including with the United States Senate and the United States Secret Service, and as a consultant in the national security community.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

 

Blog Tour Schedule

Tuesday, October 8
Review at Gwendalyn’s Books

Thursday, October 10
Feature at What Is That Book About

Monday, October 14
Interview at Jathan & Heather

Friday, October 18
Review at Reading is My Remedy
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books

Monday, October 21
Interview at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, October 23
Excerpt at Chicks, Rogues and Scandals

Thursday, October 24
Review at Impressions In Ink

Tuesday, October 29
Review at Peaceful Pastime

Thursday, October 31
Review at Passages to the Past

Friday, November 1
Feature at Coffee and Ink

Tuesday, November 5
Review at Red Headed Book Lady

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away a paperback copy of The Batter’s Box! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on November 5th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Paperback giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

The Batter’s Box

Book Review

Release Day

Ten Thousand Doors of January

#0rbitbook @AlixEHarrow

Thank you to Orbit Books for gifting me a finished copy. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.

Title: The Ten Thousand Doors of January
Author: Alix E. Harrow
Publication date: September 10, 2019
Publisher: Redhook
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Historical

In the summer of 1901, at the age of seven, January Scaller found a Door. You know the kind of door–they lead to Faerie, to Valhalla, to Atlantis, to all the places never found on a map.

Years later, January has forgotten her brief glimpse of Elsewhere. Her life is quiet and lonely but safe on her guardian’s estate, until one day she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds in its pages, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure, and danger. A book that might lead her back to the half-remembered door of her childhood.

But, as January gets answers to questions she never imagined, shadows creep closer. There are truths about the world that should never be revealed. 

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble.

Title: The Ten Thousand Doors of January
Author: Alix E. Harrow
Publication date: September 10, 2019
Publisher: Redhook, Orbit Book Publishing
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Historical Fiction

I received a copy of this book from the publisher (Orbit/Redhook) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5 Star Book

One of the most stunning, captivating book of 2019

“Listen, not every story is made for telling. Sometimes just by telling a story you’re stealing it, stealing a little of the mystery away from it.”

Have you ever had penchant for the whimsical? Have you looked sideways at doors ever? Or held your breath as walked through a threshold? Or maybe in a moment of fancy, while staring longing at a wall hoping for for a chance of something magical. An opening, a portal…That just maybe there is something magical in the world.

I have despite voices to the contrary, telling me otherwise.

Are you a readers who remembers what it was once like to have the ability to imagine a wide world of endless possibilities. In Within these pages, January will discover the impossible truth of her own existence– and the harrowing dangers that lurk between the Doors and other worlds. 

This fairy tale will have you stepping through the void, into fables, folklore, adventure, love and sanctuary, and the infinite power of words and love. In this completely original lyrical debut, Alix E. Harrow captivating book is a magical blend of both historical fiction and magical realism.

Alix E. Harrow effortless writing is stunning and unconsciously literary.

” I almost didn’t notice the Door at all. All Doors are like that, half-shadowed and sideways until someone looks at them in just the right way.”

The Ten Thousand Doors of January is completely original storyline but written in classical childhood fairy tale style of older work. Beautiful writing that is poetic and the words are fluid in this captivating and lyrical debut. In the turn of the twentieth century, a time of change with inventions and new discoveries, We meet January, an oddly colored, wild and headstrong imaginative girl.

From the first pages I fell in love with January Scaller. When we first meet January, she is seven years old and, though her father is living, she is being cared for by Mr. Locke, her fathers benefactor. Her father travels the world, seeking out exotic treasures to bring back to his employer. Throughout her childhood years, she is herded and tamed into submission, well almost..

The Ten Thousand Doors of January, is lush and richly imaginative book of impossible journeys, unforgettable love, and the incredible power of opening doors .

Alix Harrow’s has masterly written a captivating illustrious tale with this story. If you love stories that have rich descriptive prose and a within a wonderful historical storyline with magical realism then you definitely want to pick this one up.

Life has a kind of momentum to it, I’ve found, an accumulated weight of decisions which becomes impossible to shift.”

Alix E. Harrow has been a student and a teacher, a farm-worker and a cashier, an ice-cream-scooper and a 9-to-5 office-dweller. She’s lived in tents and cars, cramped city apartments and lonely cabins, and spent a summer in a really sweet ’79 VW Vanagon. She has library cards in at least five states.

Now she’s a full-time writer living in with her husband and two semi-feral kids in Kentucky. Her short fiction has appeared in Shimmer, Strange Horizons, Tor.com, Apex, and other venues, and The Ten Thousand Doors of January is her debut novel. Find her wasting time and having opinions at @AlixEHarrow on Twitter.

Book Tour

The Necromancer’s Bride

The Necromancer’s Bride
Kat Ross
(Gaslamp Gothic, #4)
Published by: Acorn Publishing
Publication date: May 31st 2019
Genres: Adult, Fantasy, Paranormal, Retelling

Forgiveness is not Gabriel D’Ange’s strong suit.

A self-appointed soldier of God with a penchant for ruthlessly punishing his enemies, he vanished after Anne Lawrence stabbed him with his own dagger.

The smart thing would be to let him go.

Unfortunately, Anne’s life isn’t just lonely without Gabriel. It’s insufferably boring.

Determined to heal the rift between them, she goes in search of her tempestuous former lover, black parasol in hand and daeva magic crackling at her fingertips. But Gabriel has his own plans afoot and Anne finds herself drawn into one of his tangled webs, much against her better judgment.

Gabriel’s nemesis has reappeared in Brussels, a vile slaver who’s plundering the Congo Free State with the blessing of King Leopold. Gabriel might be willing to give Anne a second chance, but not until Jorin Bekker’s head is lying at his feet.

Back in London, the quasi-reformed necromancer Balthazar sets his sights on the same quarry. He holds a very personal grudge against Bekker — and killing him might be the only way to keep Gabriel D’Ange from Balthazar’s own throat.

When the hunters collide at a lavish gala thrown by the king, Anne learns just how far she’ll go to save the man she loves.

Note: The Necromancer’s Bride is the sequel to A Bad Breed, which should be read first.

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble / iBooks / Kobo / Google Play

The Necromancer’s Bride.

Gaslamps Gothic Series, is a Victorian-era paranormal fantasy series

This book was received from the Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

The Author Kat Ross’s Victorian-era paranormal fantasy series The Necromancer’s Bride is the sequel to A Bad Breed, And takes off just as A Bad Breed Ended.

Anne Lawrence is a daeva, who has the ability to use elemental magic.

The man She is in love with was almost killed by her hand. Will he able to forgive Anne? Gabriel is a Necromancer A self-appointed soldier of God with a penchant for ruthlessly punishing his enemies. Anne goes against her better judgment and is drawn into a Gabriel vengeful web.

The Necromancer’s Bride, catapultes you into a dark Victorian era. The authors writing flows, and the characters are well developed along with notable sub characters. The book is a creative blend of turn of the century Victorian with a lot of fantasy_magical realism.

Kat Ross delivers such a wickedly delightful, gripping and immersive tale that totally sucked me right into this hauntingly dark gothic suspense novel. Once I started reading this one it was hard not to get totally wrapped up in Jane’s fascinating, snarky, obsessive and audacious character. Making it quite the deliciously fun, compelling and an all consuming page-turner. 

Imaginative and captivating the ending was perfect and sets up for a continuation this amazing series.

Highly recommend this book and it’s series to anyone who enjoys a great storyline and incredible writing

I am definitely looking forward to the next installment in this series., Kat Ross has become an auto-buy for me!

Gaslamps Gothic Series, is a Victorian-era paranormal fantasy series

by author Kat Ross.

Books Include:

The Daemoniac,

The Thirteenth Gate, A Bad Breed

The Necromancer’s Bride

?????

Author Bio:

Kat Ross worked as a journalist at the United Nations for ten years before happily falling back into what she likes best: making stuff up. She’s the author of the Fourth Element and Fourth Talisman fantasy series, the Gaslamp Gothic paranormal mysteries, and the dystopian thriller Some Fine Day. She loves myths, monsters and doomsday scenarios. Check out Kat’s Pinterest page for the people, places and things that inspire her books.

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

GIVEAWAY!
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Book Tour All The Bad Apples

#penguinteen #allthebadapples

Title: All the Bad Apples

Author: Moïra Fowley-Doyle

Genre: YA, Magical Realism

Publisher:  Penguin UK / Kathy Dawson Books  US

Publication date: August 1 / August 27 2019

Hardcover: 352 pages

@penguinteen

Huge thanks to Penguin for sending me an early copy of this book!
Trigger warnings for homophobia, abortion, suicide, rape, abuse, forced pregnancy.

‘It’s on every woman in this country. Kept in shame and silence for generations. Kicked out, locked up, taken away. Their children sold in illegal adoptions; their babies buried in unmarked graves. Forced pregnancies and back-street abortions, eleven a day on the boat to England only to come home to rejection and stigma. Insults and prayers and keeping up appearances – and how do you break a curse like that?’

“Some loves ignite like forest fires, burn down entire towns before anybody’s noticed. . . Some loves smolder like a turf fire, are slow to start but will then burn bright and steady through entire winters.”

“A good cup of tea is a witch’s brew,” the old women said together with wicked grins. “Heals all ills.”

The stunning new novel about silenced female voices, family secrets and dangerous truths from the author of The Accident Season.

‘Exquisite . . . This is a book to hold tightly to your chest’ Irish Times

‘Lyrical . . . Compelling’ Guardian

‘Beautiful, visceral . . . A primal scream’ Louise O’Neill

‘Uncompromising, raw, devastating’ Publishers Weekly

‘I am in absolute awe of it’ Melinda Salisbury

Moïra Fowley-Doyle is half-French, half-Irish and made of equal parts feminism, whimsy and Doc Martens. She lives in Dublin where she writes magic realism, reads tarot cards and raises witch babies.

Moïra’s first novel, The Accident Season, was shortlisted for the 2015 Waterstones Children’s Book Prize & the North East Teen Book Awards, nominated for the Carnegie Medal & won the inaugural School Library Association of Ireland Great Reads Award. It received two starred reviews & sold in ten territories. Her second novel, Spellbook of the Lost and Found, was published in summer 2017, received a starred review from School Library Journal and was shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards.


Blog Tour A House Of Rage & Sorrow

#ATourOfRageAndSorrow @CaffeineTours, @SkyPonyPress, @SanguMandanna

A House of Rage and Sorrow

Author: Sangu Mandanna

Book Two in the Celestial Series 

Published: 3rd September 2019

Publisher: Sky Pony Press

Cover Designer: Kate Gartner |

Source: Publisher/Caffeine Book Tours via Edelweiss

Sangu Mandanna’s Website

One kingdom. One crown. One family.

“Maybe it’s time the great House of Rey came to an end. After all, what are we now? Just a house of rage and sorrow.”

Esmae once wanted nothing more than to help her golden brother win the crown of Kali but that dream died with her best friend. Alexi broke her heart, and she vowed to destroy him for it. And with her sentient warship Titania beside her, how can she possibly fail?

As gods, beasts, and kingdoms choose sides, Alexi seeks out a weapon more devastating than even Titania. Past lives threaten the present. Old enemies claim their due. And Esmae cannot outrun the ghosts and the questions that haunt her. What really happened to her father? What was the third boon her mother asked of Amba? For in the shadows, lurking in wait, are secrets that will swallow her whole.

The House of Rey is at war. And the entire galaxy will bleed before the end.

Amazon | Goodreads

Thank you to Caffeine Blog Tours for allowing me to take part in this blog tour, and to Edelweiss and Sky Pony Press for this free e-ARC of the novel.

A House of Rage and Sorrow, picks up a few months after A Spark of White Fire finish. This is an action packed book, that blends Mahabharata Hindu mythology, along with an Epic Science-Fiction to creative an enjoyable powerful Space Opera.

A vivid, gripping brilliant sequel with a turbulent continuous moving plot-line, that readers will not be able to put down.

A House of Rage and Sorrow, starts off quickly from within its first chapters and then just goes full steam. In this second installment, the author continues to masterly create some of the most amazing world building and the characters come to life much more here than in the previous introductory book in this trilogy.

The book is an complexity of political intrigue, and nail biting roller coaster of a ride.

The Authors vibrant characters, and interesting plots inspired by existing Hindu folklore. Sangu Mandanna has masterly recreated the interwoven Mahabharata mythology, while adding her own twist. I was captivated from page one. I found this story to be engrossing, well thought out.

Perfectly paced and captivating with rich imaginable world building. The storyline is engaging and compelling, The novel is so intriguing, and well-written, with absolutely fantastic characters that totally captivated and fascinated me. I really enjoyed the multi-POV’s, I’m fairly sure rarely any reader gets the chance to see a sentient of a warship’s Point of view.

The strength of this novel handsdown is the author’s fabulous characterizations,

I was captivated and totally invested in the characters struggles in this emotional, sometimes heartbreaking riveting tale. A perfectly created explosive, cliffhanger of ending ending.

International Giveaway 

Make sure to enter the Giveaway!

The prize is for the privilege of naming one of the Book 3 characters. It will have one winner, and the giveaway is taking place on Caffeine Book Tours twitter! It is of course open internationally.

Named one of the best 25 space opera books by BookRiot!

The first book in a scifi retelling of the Mahabrahata. When Esmae wins a contest of skill, she sets off events that trigger an inevitable and unwinnable war that pits her against the family she would give anything to return to.

In a universe of capricious gods, dark moons, and kingdoms built on the backs of spaceships, a cursed queen sends her infant daughter away, a jealous uncle steals the throne of Kali from his nephew, and an exiled prince vows to take his crown back. 

Raised alone and far away from her home on Kali, Esmae longs to return to her family. When the King of Wychstar offers to gift the unbeatable, sentient warship Titania to a warrior that can win his competition, she sees her way home: she’ll enter the competition, reveal her true identity to the world, and help her famous brother win back the crown of Kali. 

It’s a great plan. Until it falls apart. 

Inspired by the Mahabharata and other ancient Indian stories, A Spark of White Fire is a lush, sweeping space opera about family, curses, and the endless battle between jealousy and love.

The Author

Sangu Mandanna was four years old when an elephant chased her down a forest road and she decided to write her first story about it. Seventeen years and many, many manuscripts later, she signed her first book deal. Sangu now lives in Norwich, a city in the east of England, with her husband and kids.

Author Links:

Author website  Goodreads  Twitter 

Book Tour Cover Reveal

Hello Everyone,

Today I Am Partnered with HFBT And

The Author Nancy Bilyeau,

To Bringing You This Gorgeous Cover Reveal

#DreamlandCoverReveal @NancyBilyeauAuthor @EndeavourMedia1 @Tudorscribe @Endeavour_Media @EndeavourQuill

Dreamland
by Nancy Bilyeau

Publication Date: January 16, 2020
Endeavor Quill

Genre: Historical Fiction

@NancyBilyeauAuthor @EndeavourMedia1

@Tudorscribe @Endeavour_Media @EndeavourQuill

The year is 1911 when twenty-year-old heiress Peggy Batternberg is invited to spend the summer in America’s Playground.

But the invitation to Coney Island is unwelcome. Despite hailing from one of America’s richest families, Peggy would much rather spend the summer at the Moonrise Bookstore where she works voluntarily, than keeping up appearances with Brooklyn socialites and her snobbish, controlling family.

But soon it transpires that the hedonism of Coney Island affords Peggy more of the freedom she has been longing for. For one, she finds herself in love with a troubled pier-side artist of humble means, whom the Batternberg patriarchs would surely disapprove of.

Disapprove they may, but hidden behind their pomposity lurks a web of deceit, betrayal and deadly secrets. And as bodies begin to mount up amidst the sweltering clamour of Coney Island, it seems the powerful Batternbergs can get away with anything…even murder.s

It is up to Peggy to overcome the oppression of her family and clear the name of her vulnerable lover, before she or her beloved sister become the next victims of Dreamland.

Extravagant, intoxicating and thumping with suspense, bestselling Nancy Bilyeau’s magnificent Dreamland is a story of corruption, class and dangerous obsession.

About the Author

“Dreamland” is Nancy Bilyeau’s fifth novel of historical suspense. She is the author of the best-selling historical thriller “The Blue” and the Tudor mystery series “The Crown,” “The Chalice,” and “The Tapestry,” on sale in nine countries.

Nancy is a magazine editor who has lived in the United States and Canada. She studied History and English Literature at the University of Michigan. After moving to New York City, she worked on the staffs of “InStyle,” “Good Housekeeping,” and “Rolling Stone.” She is currently the deputy editor of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at the Research Foundation of CUNY and a regular contributing writer to “Town & Country” and “Mystery Scene Magazine.”

Nancy’s mind is always in past centuries but she currently lives with her husband and two children in Forest Hills in the borough of Queens. “Dreamland” is her first novel set in her adopted hometown of New York City.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | BookBub

Cover Reveal Schedule

Monday, August 19
A Bookish Affair
Gwendalyn’s Books
What Is That Book About

Tuesday, August 20
Clarissa Reads it All
Just One More Chapter
Books In Their Natural Habitat

Wednesday, August 21
Unabridged Chick
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A Darn Good Read
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Monday, August 26
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Featured Book Reviewer

Book Tour and Review

Hi book-lovers!

And welcome to my stop

on the blog tour

for The Devil’s Apprentice

@K_B_Andersen @RRBookTours1 #TheDevilsApprentice #TheGreatDevilWar

TheDevils

I’m very excited to share this book with you all today! The Devil’s Apprentice in the first book in the incredibly imaginative, and wonderfully entertaining, YA Fantasy series, The Great Devil War.

There will be exclusive content and a giveaway so be sure to read on!

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The Devil’s Apprentice (The Great Devil War #1)

Genre: YA Fantasy

Philip is a good boy, a really good boy, who accidentally gets sent to Hell to become the Devil’s heir. The Devil, Lucifer, is dying and desperately in need of a successor, but there’s been a mistake and Philip is the wrong boy. Philip is terrible at being bad, but Lucifer has no other choice than to begin the difficult task of training him in the ways of evil. Philip gets both friends and enemies in this odd, gloomy underworld—but who can he trust, when he discovers an evil-minded plot against the dark throne?

Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think. – Kenneth B. Andersen

Add to Goodreads

Excerpt

“You’re fairly young, aren’t you?” A forked tongue moistened his scaly fingers, and he flipped through more pages. “How old are you?”

“I’m thirteen.”

“Thirteen?” the beast mumbled, clearly impressed. “It’s not very often they come to us so young. You must’ve done something really horrific.”

“What do you mean?” Philip shook his head. “What is this place?”

“This place?” The monster raised an eyebrow. “Haven’t you figured it out yet? Oh well, evilness and stupidity often go hand in hand.” His crooked smile revealed pointed teeth, and his gruff voice lowered to a hiss. “This, my boy, is the outer court of Hell. That—” he directed a hooked nail at the black gate, “is Hell.”

“Hell?” Philip whispered, and he saw it all again in his mind. The cat that had spoken to him. The shove to his back that had sent him hurtling into the street. Sam’s triumphant howling. The sound of squealing brakes. The car and the elderly man behind the wheel. And the darkness that had followed.

A dream, he’d said as he stood at the top of the long stairwell, knowing deep inside that it was a lie. This was no dream.

The car hit me, he thought. It hit me, and I’m dead. I died, and now I’m in… in…

“Hell?” he repeated, totally confused. How could he be in Hell? Only evil people went to Hell. Right? “I’m in Hell?”

“You need to say that three times before it sinks in?” the demon said, skimming through his book. “But it could be worse. Plenty others have to say it many more times before it sinks in. Ah, here it is! Let me see.” From the breast pocket of his robe he drew out a pair of silver-framed spectacles and put them on. The demon scanned the page quickly, using his finger as a guide.

“Just like I said,” he shouted angrily, pounding the book with his balled fist. “No one was supposed to enter tonight! Not for a few hours anyway, when an entire troop of politicians were to arrive!” The creature shook his head resignedly. “Well, since you’ve already spoiled my night off, I might as well send you straight to your punishment. What is your name, kid?”

Philip didn’t reply, but stared at the demon, dumbstruck.

“Wake up! We don’t have all night. Eternity waits. Your name?”

Philip cleared his throat timidly. “Philip.”

“Philip, Philip, Philip,” the demon mumbled, riffling back and forth a few pages. He wrinkled his brow. “That’s odd. Last name?”

Philip told him his full name, and once again the demon searched in his book. The wrinkles in his brow deepened, and his yellow nails scratched at his scalp. Then he shook his head and clapped the book shut with a sigh. “That name isn’t in the registry. Some dumb fool has made a mistake, kid. You’re not supposed to be here.”

“I’m not?” Philip said and felt a warm relief spreading through him. Then his eyes fell on the inky, thick darkness that enveloped the walls of Hell, and his sense of relief vanished. “Then where should I be?”

Available on Amazon!

The Great Devil War Books 1 – 3

Outlook-sxiohn0q

For your chance to win a digital copy of The Devil’s Apprentice, click the link below!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

“Let that be your first lesson, Philip. Down here, humor is always dark.”

The Devil’s Apprentice, Is the First in a series of The Great Devil War Books

A fun an intriguing adventure fantasy that is full of dark humor, and fantasy world building.

A mistake and a twist of fate, sets in motion the storyline.

Cleverly written in third POV of Philip Engle, a thirteen-year-old boy who lives with his mother and who lost his father when he was very young.

The book is a page-turner, there are heroes and villain and it’s absolutely hilarious. Rich fantasy world building that is both imaginative and engaging.

Descriptive details, along with snarky humor keep you captivated.

The author combines Christian theology, mystery with coming-of-age twisted plot.  It made good use of biblical mythology and tries to give a convincing argument as to why evil is necessary. Anderson, creatively draws you into feeling empathy for Lucifer and the fate of his hellish kingdom. 

The writing PG since this is a middle grade book but its concept and dark humor might elevate it to an older audiences.

Most of the book takes pace in fictional Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will. A bookish tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective.

Thank you so much for reading book lovers!

I love discussing wonderful books with all of you so please comment below and let me know your thoughts. Do you see yourself reading this book? Do you love the genre?

Have a Wonderful Day

About the Author

kba_5_thumb

I WAS BORN IN DENMARK ON A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT IN NOVEMBER 1976 …

… and I began writing when I was a teenager. My first book was a really awful horror novel titled Nidhug’s Slaves. It didn’t get published. Luckily.

During the next 7 years, I wrote nearly 20 novels–all of which were rejected–while working as a school teacher. The rest of the time I spent writing.

In 2000 I published my debut fantasy book, The Battle of Caïssa, and that’s when things really took off. Since then I’ve published more than thirty-five books for children and young adults in genres ranging from fantasy to horror and science fiction.

My books have been translated into more than 15 languages and my series about the superhero Antboy has been adapted for film, which is available on Netflix. An animated tv series is currently in development.

A musical of The Devil’s Apprentice opened in the fall 2018 and the movie rights for the series have also been optioned.

I live in Copenhagen with my wife, two boys, a dog named Milo and spiders in the basement.

About THE GREAT DEVIL WAR: The Great Devil War was published in Denmark from 2005-2016, beginning with The Devil’s Apprentice.

Even though the story (mostly) takes place in Hell and deals with themes like evil, death and free will, it is also a humoristic tale about good and evil seen from a different perspective. A tale that hopefully will make the reader – young or old, boy or girl – laugh and think.

Welcome to the other side!

Kenneth B. Andersen | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

TheDevils

Blog Tour Schedule

August 19th

Reads & Reels (Review) http://readsandreels.com

The Magic of Wor(l)ds (Interview) http://themagicofworlds.wordpress.com

Jessica Belmont (Review) https://jessicabelmont.wordpress.com/

Gwendalyn’s Books (Review) https://gwendalynbooks.blog/

August 20th

YA/NA Book Divas (Excerpt) http://www.yabookdivas.com/

Ity Reads Books (Review) http://www.ityreadsbooks.home.blog

Reviews and Promos by Nyx (Review) https://nyxblogs.wordpress.com/

Quirky Cats Fat Stacks (Review) https://quirkycatsfatstacks.com/

August 21st

B is for Book Review (Excerpt) https://bforbookreview.wordpress.com

The Faerie Review (Review) http://www.thefaeriereview.com

An Ocean A Glimmer (Review) http://anoceanglimmer.wordpress.com

August 22nd

Jaunts & Haunts (Review) https://jonathanpongratz.com/

Shalini’s Books and Reviews (Review) https://bookreviewsbyshalini.com/

The Bookworm Drinketh (Review) http://thebookwormdrinketh.wordpress.com/

I Love Books and Stuff (Excerpt) https://ilovebooksandstuffblog.wordpress.com

August 23rd

Breakeven Books (Excerpt) https://breakevenbooks.com

Entertainingly Nerdy (Review) https://www.entertaininglynerdy.com

Cats Luv Coffee (Review) https://catsluvcoffeez.blogspot.com/

Blog Tour Organized By

R&RButto200x200

R&R Book Tours

Book To movie

Hello Bookish Friends,

Do you enjoy the classics?

How about Movie adaptations of Classical Books?

Here is a sneak peek of upcoming Movie, coming out this Winter .

Classical Books To Movies

Little Women (December 25, 2019)

Based on: Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
Directed by: Greta Gerwig

Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlen, Timothée Chalamet, Laura Dern, Bob Odenkirk, James Norton, Chris Cooper, Meryl Streep

Based on Louisa May Alcott’s 1868 novel, the trailer introduces the four March sisters — Meg (Emma Watson of “Harry Potter” fame), Jo (Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”), Beth (Eliza Scanlen, “Sharp Objects”), and Amy (Florence Pugh, “Midsommar”) — living in a cramped house Alcott loosely based on her own home in Concord, Mass.

In this new adaptation directed by Greta Gerwig (Ladybird) Saoirse Ronan plays Jo, Emma Watson as Meg, Florence Pugh as Amy and Eliza Scanlen as Beth. The rest of the cast is too good not to share including Timothée Chalamet as Laurie, Meryl Streep as Aunt March and James Norton as John Brooke. To add to the excitement, the score is being written by the genius Alexander Desplat. The film is set to be released this Christmas! –

This is now one of several adaptations of the book onto the screen so it will be interesting to see how it compares.

Little Women” will land in theaters on Dec. 25, 2019.

Click the Link: to watch the New Trailer
Little Woman 2019 Trailer

QOTD:: Have Read Little Woman?

When asked Why She Remained A Spinster? Mrs Alcott Reply Was….

Because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man.”

Louisa May Alcott’s grave in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts.

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for the novel Little Women, set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, and published in 1868. This novel is loosely based on her childhood experiences with her three sisters.

Alcott’s father established an experimental school and joined the Transcendental Club with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

Alcott’s early education included lessons from the naturalist Henry David Thoreau. She received the majority of her schooling from her father. She received some instruction also from writers and educators such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller, who were all family friends. She later described these early years in a newspaper sketch entitled “Transcendental Wild Oats”.

Alcott became an advocate for women’s suffrage and was the first woman to register to vote in Concord, Massachusetts, in a school board election.

“Some books are so

familiar that reading them is

like being home again”

—Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. She is best known for the novel Little Women, set in the Alcott family home, Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, and published in 1868. This novel is loosely based on her childhood experiences with her three sisters.

Alcott was the daughter of noted transcendentalist and educator Amos Bronson Alcott and Abigail May Alcott. She shared a birthday with her father on November 29, 1832. In a letter to his brother-in-law, Samuel Joseph May, a noted abolitionist, her father wrote: “It is with great pleasure that I announce to you the birth of my second daughter…born about half-past 12 this morning, on my [33rd] birthday.” Though of New England heritage, she was born in Germantown, which is currently part of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was the second of four daughters: Anna Bronson Alcott was the eldest; Elizabeth Sewall Alcott and Abigail May Alcott were the two youngest. The family moved to Boston in 1834,[1] After the family moved to Massachusetts, Alcott’s father established an experimental school and joined the Transcendental Club with Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.

In 1840, after several setbacks with the school, the Alcott family moved to a cottage on 2 acres (8,100 m2) of land, situated along the Sudbury River in Concord, Massachusetts. The Alcott family moved to the Utopian Fruitlands community for a brief interval in 1843-1844 and then, after its collapse, to rented rooms and finally to a house in Concord purchased with her mother’s inheritance and financial help from Emerson. They moved into the home they named “Hillside” on April 1, 1845.

Alcott’s early education included lessons from the naturalist Henry David Thoreau. She received the majority of her schooling from her father. She received some instruction also from writers and educators such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Fuller, who were all family friends. She later described these early years in a newspaper sketch entitled “Transcendental Wild Oats”. The sketch was reprinted in the volume Silver Pitchers (1876), which relates the family’s experiment in “plain living and high thinking” at Fruitlands.

As an adult, Alcott was an abolitionist and a feminist. In 1847, the family housed a fugitive slave for one week. In 1848, Alcott read and admired the “Declaration of Sentiments” published by the Seneca Falls Convention on women’s rights.

Poverty made it necessary for Alcott to go to work at an early age as an occasional teacher, seamstress, governess, domestic helper, and writer. Her first book was Flower Fables (1849), a selection of tales originally written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In 1860, Alcott began writing for the Atlantic Monthly. When the American Civil War broke out, she served as a nurse in the Union Hospital at Georgetown, D.C., for six weeks in 1862-1863. Her letters home – revised and published in the Commonwealth and collected as Hospital Sketches (1863, republished with additions in 1869) – garnered her first critical recognition for her observations and humor. Her novel Moods (1864), based on her own experience, was also promising.

She also wrote passionate, fiery novels and sensational stories under the nom de plume A. M. Barnard. Among these are A Long Fatal Love Chase and Pauline’s Passion and Punishment. Her protagonists for these tales are willful and relentless in their pursuit of their own aims, which often include revenge on those who have humiliated or thwarted them. Written in a style which was wildly popular at the time, these works achieved immediate commercial success.

Alcott produced wholesome stories for children also, and after their positive reception, she did not generally return to creating works for adults. Adult-oriented exceptions include the anonymous novelette A Modern Mephistopheles (1875), which attracted suspicion that it was written by Julian Hawthorne; and the semi-autobiographical tale Work (1873).

Literary success and later life

Alcott’s literary success arrived with the publication by the Roberts Brothers of the first part of Little Women: or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, (1868) a semi-autobiographical account of her childhood with her sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. Part two, or Part Second, also known as Good Wives, (1869) followed the March sisters into adulthood and their respective marriages. Little Men (1871) detailed Jo’s life at the Plumfield School that she founded with her husband Professor Bhaer at the conclusion of Part Two of Little Women. Jo’s Boys (1886) completed the “March Family Saga.”

In “Little Women,” Alcott based her heroine “Jo” on herself. But whereas Jo marries at the end of the story, Alcott remained single throughout her life. She explained her “spinsterhood” in an interview with Louise Chandler Moulton, “… because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man.” However, Alcott’s romance while in Europe with Ladislas Wisniewski, “Laddie,” was detailed in her journals but then deleted by Alcott herself before her death. Alcott identified Laddie as the model for Laurie in Little Women, and there is strong evidence this was the significant emotional relationship of her life.

In 1879 her younger sister, May, died. Alcott took in May’s daughter, Louisa May Nieriker (“Lulu”), who was two years old. The baby had been named after her aunt, but was nicknamed Lulu, whereas Louisa May’s nicknames were “Weed” and “Louy.”

In her later life, Alcott became an advocate for women’s suffrage and was the first woman to register to vote in Concord, Massachusetts, in a school board election.

Alcott, along with Elizabeth Stoddard, Rebecca Harding Davis, Anne Moncure Crane, and others, were part of a group of female authors during the Gilded Age who addressed women’s issues in a modern and candid manner. Their works were, as one newspaper columnist of the period commented, “among the decided ‘signs of the times’” (“Review 2 – No Title” from The Radical, May 1868, see References below).

Alcott, who continued to write until her death, suffered chronic health problems in her later years. She and her earliest biographers[citation needed] attributed her illness and death to mercury poisoning: during her American Civil War service, Alcott contracted typhoid fever and was treated with a compound containing mercury. Recent analysis of Alcott’s illness suggests that mercury poisoning was not the culprit. Alcott’s chronic health problems may be associated with an autoimmune disease, not acute mercury exposure. Moreover, a late portrait of Alcott shows on her cheeks rashes characteristic of lupus.[5][6] Alcott died of a stroke in Boston, on March 6, 1888, at age 55, two days after visiting her father’s deathbed. Her last words were “Is it not meningitis?”

The story of her life and career was told initially in Ednah D. Cheney’s Louisa May Alcott: Her Life, Letters and Journals (Boston, 1889) and then in Madeleine B. Stern’s seminal biography Louisa May Alcott (University of Oklahoma Press, 1950). In 2008, John Matteson won the Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his first book, Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father. Harriet Reisen’s biography, “Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women,” was published in 2009, and includes the most extensive primary source material (much discovered since Stern’s biography), including Madelon Bedell’s unpublished notes of interviews with Lulu before Lulu’s death.The children’s biography Invincible Louisa written by Cornelia Meigs received the Newbery Award in 1934 for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

Selected works

* The Inheritance (1849, unpublished until 1997)

* Flower Fables (1849)

* Hospital Sketches (1863)

* The Rose Family: A Fairy Tale (1864)

* Moods (1865, revised 1882)

* Morning-Glories and Other Stories (1867)

* The Mysterious Key and What It Opened (1867)

* Little Women or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy (1868)

* Three Proverb Stories (includes “Kitty’s Class Day”, “Aunt Kipp” and “Psyche’s Art”) (1868)

* A Strange Island, (1868)

* Part Second of Little Women, also known as “Good Wives” (1869)

* Perilous Play, (1869)

* An Old Fashioned Girl (1870)

* Will’s Wonder Book (1870)

* Aunt Jo’s Scrap-Bag (1872–1882)

* Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo’s Boys (1871)

* “Transcendental Wild Oats” (1873)

* Work: A Story of Experience (1873)

* Eight Cousins or The Aunt-Hill (1875)

* Beginning Again, Being a Continuation of Work (1875)

* Silver Pitchers, and Independence: A Centennial Love Story,” (1876)

* Rose in Bloom: A Sequel to Eight Cousins (1876)

* Under the Lilacs (1878)

* Jack and Jill: A Village Story (1880)

* The Candy Country (1885)

* Jo’s Boys and How They Turned Out: A Sequel to “Little Men” (1886)

* Lulu’s Library (1886–1889)

* A Garland for Girls (1888)

* Comic Tragedies (1893 [posthumously])

As A. M. Barnard

* Behind a Mask, or a Woman’s Power (1866)

* The Abbot’s Ghost, or Maurice Treherne’s Temptation (1867)

* A Long Fatal Love Chase (1866 – first published 1995)

First published anonymously

* A Modern Mephistopheles (1877)

 

Have a wonderful Day

Blog Tour 120 Days and Author Interview

Hello Bookish Friends and welcome to my stop

120 Days by Ronald L. Ruiz Book Tour



Book Title:  120 Days

Author: Ronald L. Ruiz

Category:  Adult Fiction, 318 pages

Publisher:  Amika Press
Release date:   May 22, 2019
Tour dates: Aug 5 to 23, 2019

Genre:  Legal thriller, crime fiction, literary fiction

TW:There are two explicit scenes and some language

BARBARA BLAKE is a bright, young, attractive, and ambitious defense attorney. Alejandro Soto, an inmate already serving two life sentences for the brutal murder of a drug dealer and the man’s mother, is on trial for a third murder, one he did not commit but that could well result in the Death Penalty. When Blake and Soto meet in the San Cristobal, California courtroom, they begin a 120-day journey that will invariably alter both of their lives. Together, they spiral ever more deeply into the dark heart of a quintessentially American story of sex and love, truth and lies, justice and prejudice, crime and punishment, and, ultimately, life and death.Praise for 120 Days:“There is a human element here that is only found in top-tiered crime fiction, and this book is filled with it. I adore all of the major bestselling authors of this genre and have finally found a new favorite that, in my opinion, belongs in the same league. A truly brilliant novel. An exceptional writer.

Highly recommended.”
– Readers’ Favorite Reviews
Buy the Book:
Amazon.com ~ Amika Press

A Riveting Read …Emotionally Detailed

Ronald L. Ruiz’s Book 120 Days Is a courtroom drama and legal thriller.

Creative phenomenal characters and a a fast paced entertaining book. This a riveting read with emotional details, difficult conditions of Mexican immigrants.

California attorney on the rise, named Barbara Blake, And Alejandro Soto, a double-lifer now facing the death penalty Alejandro Soto, life is hanging in the balance, Blake’s own professional and personal come merge over the course of 120 Days.

This is a complex story that is definitely character driven, the authors ability to create emotional empathy for the criminal, Alejandro. This is just another example of the storytellers ultimate writing ability to illicit your response and trigger the ultimate reader response.

What really stood out for me was a social commentary on the American justice system and society as a whole. This is was such emotional and intimately brilliant read of a controversial topic that weaves together an engaging and critical aspect of our justice system.

This is a must read, with a critical message that goes beyond a surface response.

1. How did you do research for your book?

I did no specific research for this book other than returning to my own life experiences and reflecting on my actions and motives, as well as those of other people around me.

 

 

2. Which was the hardest character to write? The easiest?

The hardest character to write was Barbara Blake because she is a woman and I am a man with a man’s perspectives. I asked several female friends to give me feedback to help me with the woman’s perspective. The easiest character for me was the lawyer, Greg Olsen, because I was a criminal defense lawyer and prosecutor myself for 37 years.

 

 

3. How did you come up with this idea? What made you write a book about it?

This book is about a successful woman lawyer falling in love with a twice-convicted murderer who she is now representing in a death penalty trial. The idea came from a similar situation that I was aware of and had almost first-hand knowledge about. I can’t think of anything more compelling to write about.

 

 

4. Your book is set in a courthouse, jail and prison. Have you ever been there?

Absolutely. I spent 37 years working as a criminal defense attorney and prosecutor. I was in those places probably more than I was anyplace else, other than my home.

 

 

5. Do you have another profession besides writing?

I am now retired as a lawyer after 37 years working in criminal cases, but I have been a volunteer teaching English to prison inmates and at local schools.

 

Giveaway:

Prizes:  Win one of two copies of 120 Days, or Amazon gift card of $30 (3 winners) (open USA & Canada)

Ends August 30, 2019

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/defcd44e474/

Meet the author:   Ronald L. Ruiz is a retired attorney whose entire career was spent in criminal law as a deputy District Attorney, a District Attorney, a Defense Attorney and a Public Defender.

Book Review The Undertakers Assistant

Hello Bookish Friends

Thanks for joining me today

There are few places on earth that I love more than New Orleans, Louisiana.

I lived for 34 years in South Louisiana, So New Orleans will all always be very special to me. Along with the amazing food and the wonderful people, there is so much historical places that few people other than native to the area know about.

Storyville, a city within the city that had its own Mayor and prostitution was legal from 1897 to 1917. This neighborhood born some of biggest known Jazz musicians ever. To the areas where the the Quadroon Balls of New Orleans where held.

THE UNDERTAKER’S ASSISTANT

BY AMANDA SKENANDORE

Publication Date: July 30, 2019

Kensington Publishing Corp.

eBook & Paperback; 304 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction

Set during Reconstruction-era New Orleans, and with an extraordinary and unforgettable heroine at its heart, The Undertaker’s Assistant is a powerful story of human resilience–and of the unlikely bonds that hold fast even in our darkest moments.

Synopsis:

“The dead can’t hurt you. Only the living can.” Effie Jones, a former slave who escaped to the Union side as a child, knows the truth of her words. Taken in by an army surgeon and his wife during the War, she learned to read and write, to tolerate the sight of blood and broken bodies–and to forget what is too painful to bear. Now a young freedwoman, she has returned south to New Orleans and earns her living as an embalmer, her steady hand and skillful incisions compensating for her white employer’s shortcomings.

Tall and serious, Effie keeps her distance from the other girls in her boarding house, holding tight to the satisfaction she finds in her work. But despite her reticence, two encounters–with a charismatic state legislator named Samson Greene, and a beautiful young Creole, Adeline–introduce her to new worlds of protests and activism, of soirees and social ambition. Effie decides to seek out the past she has blocked from her memory and try to trace her kin. As her hopes are tested by betrayal, and New Orleans grapples with violence and growing racial turmoil, Effie faces loss and heartache, but also a chance to finally find her place . . .

Purchase links :

AMAZON | BARNES AND NOBLE | INDIEBOUND

Praise for Amanda Skenandore and Between Earth and Sky

“Gripping and beautifully written, Between Earth and Sky tugs at the heart with its dynamic heroine and unique cast of characters. Though this novel brings alive two historical American eras and settings, the story is achingly modern, universal and important.” –Karen Harper, New York Times bestselling author of The It Girls

“Intensely emotional. . . . Skenandore’s deeply introspective and moving novel will appeal to readers of American history, particularly those interested in the dynamics behind the misguided efforts of white people to better the lives Native American by forcing them to adopt white cultural mores.” –Publishers Weekly

“A masterfully written novel about the heart-wrenching clash of two American cultures . . . a fresh and astonishing debut.” –V.S. Alexander, author of The Magdalen Girls and The Taster

“By describing its costs in human terms, the author shapes tension between whites and Native Americans into a touching story. The title of Skenandore’s debut could refer to reality and dreams, or to love and betrayal; all are present in this highly original novel.” –Booklist

“A heartbreaking story about the destructive legacy of the forced assimilation of Native American children. Historical fiction readers and book discussion groups will find much to ponder here.” –Library Journal

“At its heart, this luminous book tells a Romeo and Juliet story. But Skenandore’s book is so much more than a simple romance. This novel examines the complex relationship between love and loss, culture and conquest, annihilation and assimilation.” –Historical Novel Society

This book was received as an ARC from the publisher and Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

A deeply intriguing and introspective moving novel

Amanda Skenandore, new novel is Intensely emotional historical drama set during the Reconstruction-era New Orleans. Euphemia also known as Effie is a compelling and unforgettable heroine. A former slave and now an accomplished undertaker’s assistant, she has returned to New Orleans to forge a new life and confront her traumatic deeply barrier past.

Skenandore involves all the senses in her evocation of the past, from the bustling, multi-lingual French Quarter, where Creole socialites are elevated. to the riveting terrifying raids of mobs of angry white men that carry out violence against law-abiding Black citizens. An educated freedwoman Effie who’s occupation as an embalmer makes her stand out among the rest. Barely 21 years old Effie takes a position with a white employer. Her meticulous talents as an embalmer make up for her present employers short comings. The author does a wonderful narrative setting the plot line up in the beginning as we get to know each character and a bit of the back stories. This richly atmospheric historical fiction with interpersonal drama and well developed characters with a creative storyline will keep you glued to the pages.

Under the Authors narrative voice you are catapult into the book setting of 1870s

New Orleans.

Authenticity researched this novel examines the complex relationship between love and loss, culture and social caste, and assimilation

Skenandore’s impressive second novel, The Undertaker’s Assistant, is a phenomenal book, that I will definitely recommend to my family and friends

A deeply intriguing and introspective moving novel

A little Piece of History

The System of Plaçage

The Quadroon balls were elegant and elaborate, designed to appeal to wealthy white men. Although race mixing was prohibited by New Orleans law, it was common for white gentleman to attend the balls, sometimes stealing away from white balls to mingle with the city’s quadroon female population. The principal desire of quadroon women attending these balls was to become placée as the mistress of a wealthy gentleman, usually a young white Creole or a visiting European.[21] These arrangements were a common occurrence, Some suggests, because the highly educated, socially refined quadroons were prohibited from marrying white men and were unlikely to find Black men of their own status.

A quadroon’s mother usually negotiated with an admirer the compensation that would be received for having the woman as his mistress. Typical terms included some financial payment to the parent, financial and/or housing arrangements for the quadroon herself, and, many times, paternal recognition of any children the union produced. Some of these matches were as enduring and exclusive as marriages. A beloved quadroon mistress had the power to destabilize white marriages and families, something she was much resented for.

The system of plaçage had a basis in the economics of mixed race. The plaçage of black women with white lovers, One could take place only because of the socially determined value of their light skin, the same light skin that commanded a higher price on the slave block, where light skinned girls fetched much higher prices than did prime field hands The quadroon balls as the best among severely limited options for these near-white women, a way for them to control their sexuality and decide the price of their own bodies.

“The most a mulatto mother and a quadroon daughter could hope to attain in the rigid confines of the black/white world was some semblance of economic independence and social distinction from the slaves and other blacks”

Amanda Skenandore, is a historical fiction writer and registered nurse. Between Earth and Sky was her first novel. She lives in Las Vegas, Nevada. Readers can visit her website at www.amandaskenandore.com.
#Skenandore #bookreview #thrundertaker @arshenandoah @kensingtonbooks #theundertakersassistant

Book Tour Author Interview

Hello and welcome to Gwendalyn’s Books

Happy Tuesday to you! I hope your week will be is overflowing with great reads.

I am delighted to welcome a wonderful author to the blog today,

Chris Thorndycroft

Sign of the White Foal
by Chris Thorndycroft

Publication Date: July 1, 2019
eBook & Paperback; 327 Pages

Series: Arthur of the Cymry Trilogy (Book 1)
Genre: Historical Fiction

 

A generation after Hengest and Horsa carved out a kingdom in the east, a hero of the Britons rises in the west…

480 A.D. The sons of Cunedag have ruled Venedotia for fifty years but the chief of them – the Pendraig – is now dying. His sons Cadwallon and Owain must fight to retain their birthright from their envious cousins. As civil war consumes Venedotia, Arthur – a young warrior and bastard son of the Pendraig – is sent on a perilous quest that will determine the fate of the kingdom.

The Morgens; nine priestesses of the Mother Goddess have found the cauldron of rebirth – a symbol of otherworldly power – and have allied themselves with the enemy. Arthur and six companions are dispatched to the mysterious island of Ynys Mon to steal the cauldron and break the power of the Morgens. Along the way they run into the formidable Guenhuifar whose family have been stewards of Ynys Mon for generations. They need her help. The trouble is, Guenhuifar despises Arthur’s family and all they stand for…

Based on the earliest Arthurian legends, Sign of the White Foal is a rip-roaring adventure of Celtic myth and real history set in the ruins of post-Roman Britain.

Amazon | IndieBound

About the Author

Chris Thorndycroft is a British writer of historical fiction, horror and fantasy. His early short stories appeared in magazines and anthologies such as Dark Moon Digest and American Nightmare. His first novel under his own name was A Brother’s Oath; the first book in the Hengest and Horsa Trilogy. He also writes under the pseudonym P. J. Thorndyke.

For more information, please visit Chris Thorndycroft’s website. You can also find him on Twitter and Goodreads.

Gwendalyn’s Books Q&A with Chris Thorndycroft

Q: Was the research easier for this book, or harder than the last series you completed?

A: Probably easier as I had done the lion’s share of research for the first trilogy. This trilogy really just follows on from the first so I had a lot of the background filled in already. It was mostly small details I had to research for this one. I generally research stuff as it comes up. Say I have a scene set in a particular town. I’ll then search for references to that town and make sure I have things like the layout right.

Q: What special challenges did you face making your story stand out from others in the genre ?

A: Arthurian fiction is a massive genre of its own and some really big authors have done their versions so it was daunting trying to come up with a unique take. There are several different ways you can look at the legend. One is to go the traditionalist route and basically use Thomas Malory as your template. He is the guy who, in the 15th century, rounded up all the things we associate with the Arthurian legend into one book – the sword in the stone, the round table, the quest for the Holy Grail etc. But that is very much in the fantasy vein. The Britain (or England) Mallory presented never existed and you’re pretty much in alternate history territory even if you strip out all the magical elements. Other writers have gone the realistic ‘how the legend might have happened’ route by grounding it very much in the 5th century and that is what I wanted to do but I knew I’d be up against several big names in doing so – Rosemary Sutcliff and Bernard Cornwell for a start! I had an idea I thought might make my Arthur stand out and that was to slot him into a real royal dynasty that ruled Gwynedd (North Wales) in the 5th century. It was fun to try and work elements of the legend around real figures.

Q: How did you go about developing the setting(s) for this story?

A: Britain at this time (the 5th century) was very wide open and mostly rural so the countryside was important. I researched what the land was like, what sort of trees, flora and fauna was around. Religion (both pagan and Christian) was a big deal for my characters so I really did the research on that. I also looked at how Roman Britain changed (or deteriorated) into post-Roman Britain, how towns decreased or were abandoned entir ely as focus shifted to a more rural economy. Hill forts, some of which had been abandoned since before the Romans came, were refortified suggesting that people moved from towns to more easily defendable places.

Q: What research methods have been most fruitful for you?

A: Reading, reading and more reading. As well as picking up several intimidating textbooks, I found the internet invaluable. Facebook groups are the haunts of some serious Arthurian scholars and reading through their posts (and occasional arguments) was really helpful. I also got ahold of a lot of academic papers relating to just about every aspect of the 5th century you can think of as well as some antique books no longer in print that have been scanned into Google books. You really have to dig and follow leads to get to the good stuff!

Q: Which character was most challenging to create? Why?

A: Probably Arthur. It’s something of a curse in Arthurian fiction that Arthur is usually the least fleshed-out character. With everybody else running off on quests, the king and his court usually just provides the backdrop. I wanted Arthur to be the main character but he’s a bit of a blank slate. I had to give him motivation, desires and fears. That, in turn, helped bring the cast around him to life.

Q: What literary pilgrimages have you gone on?

A: Living in Norway with two small children doesn’t provide many opportunities for jetting off on research trips to Britain but I did use to live in North Wales so I had those memories of the landscape to inspire me. It was fun to write scenes set on the exact stretch of coastline I used to live on.

Q: Some writers create a bubble around themselves until they’re finished with their project – how true is that in your case?

A: It’s a bit hard to create much of a bubble when you have two young kids and a full time job, but I make sure the last couple of hours in the day is my time to get stuck in and get some writing done. I try to stick with one project until it’s done but all my other writing projects keep trying to sneak in. It’s an effort to push them out and focus on what needs to be done so I suppose I do isolate myself a little bit, at least from anything that might get me excited about those other books I have planned in my head.

Q: Do you prefer writing in silence or to music?

A: Music usually, but only instrumental stuff. Song lyrics distract me when I’m writing so I stick to movie and game soundtracks mostly. There’s loads of playlists on Spotify that have been very motivational in writing my Arthur trilogy. Anything epic or stirring.

Q: What book from your childhood has shaped you most as a writer?

A: The Hobbit was a big influence. I remember my primary school teacher reading it to us and I just loved the sense of adventure, of going from one peril to another, so that has probably had an effect. I always seem to put a bit of adventure in my writing.

Q: Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

A: I don’t base characters on people I know or anything like that, at least not wholesale. Sometimes I have a real person in mind when I’m writing a character but I always make sure I change a few things! When it comes to other stuff, there are a few nods in my Arthur books to things in Arthurian literature that only real enthusiasts will spot. I try to keep things as authentic as possible even if it’s a small detail nobody will notice.

Thanks so much Chris, for visiting Gwendalyn’s Books

http://Instagram.com/gwendalyn_books_

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, July 22
Review at Gwendalyn’s Books

Tuesday, July 23
Review at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, July 24
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Thursday, July 25
Review at My Reading Chronicles

Friday, July 26
Guest Post at Gwendalyn’s Books

Monday, July 29
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Faery Tales Are Real

Tuesday, July 30
Interview at Gwendalyn’s Books
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books

Wednesday, July 31
Review at Hoover Book Reviews

Friday, August 2
Review at Stephanie’s Novel Fiction

Blog Tour The Fire Of Winter

Hello Everyone,

Thanks For Joining Me On This Very Anticipated New Novel

By D.K Marley

The Fire of Winter by D.K. Marley

Publication Date: June 1, 2019
eBook; 355 Pages
Genre: Historical Fiction

She is known as Lady Macbeth.
What leads her down the path of murder?
What secrets fire her destiny?

Gruah, granddaughter of King Cìnéad III of the Royal Clan Alpin, marries two men in less than six months, one she loves and one she hates; one in secret, the other arranged by the High King of Scotland. At the age of eighteen, she lays her palm upon the ancient stone of Scone and sees her destiny as Queen of Scotland, and she vows to do whatever necessary to see her true love, Macbeth macFindlaech, beside her on the throne.

Amid the fiery times and heated onslaughts from Denmark and England, as the rule of Scotland hangs in the balance, Gruah seeks to win the throne and bring revenge upon the monsters of her childhood, no matter the cost or amount of blood tainting her own hands; yet, an unexpected meeting with the King called the Confessor causes her to question her bloody path and doubt her once blazing pagan faith. Will she find redemption or has the blood of her past fire-branded her soul?

The story weaves the play by William Shakespeare with the actual history of Macbeth and his Queen in 11th-century Scotland.

“…a woman’s story at a winter’s fire…” (Macbeth, Act III, Scene IV)

“This beautifully written reworking of the Macbeth tale told from Lady Macbeth’s point-of-view flows from the page and you quickly become immersed in the politics and intrigues of feudal Scotland as she fights for her rightful place and her true love! A mesmerizing read that grips from start to finish and Gruah is now one of my all-time favorite literary crushes. “ – Iain Leonard, ARC Reviewer
“Brilliantly conceived and beautifully written, The Fire of Winter is a tale not to be missed by lovers of Shakespeare, lovers of history, or lovers of the written word.” – Riana Everly, Author of Teaching Eliza and Through a Different Lens

Amazon | IndieBound

A Woman’s Story .. The Fire of Winter

D.K. Marley, skillfully delivers an absolutely beautiful, richly detailed, complex and atmospheric read here that vastly intertwines historical with shakespearean fiction along with a factual events to create an astonishing fractured Shakespearean retelling. Expertly told from the descriptive voice of Lady Macbeth, Gruah.

Gruah, An alluring and ginger haired beauty, who happens to be a Princess and the granddaughter of King Cìnéad III of the Royal Clan Alpin,

She marries two men in less than six months, one she loves and one she hates; one in secret, the other arranged by the High King of Scotland.

At the age of eighteen, she lays her palm upon the ancient stone of Scone and sees her destiny.

With her ambitions heart that spurs her desire to become Queen of Scotland. A woman who instead changes the fate of herself and those around her. She rises up from a victimized little girl, to a pawn used in a political marriage to become one of the strongest and first woman to be coronated Queen of Scotland. A woman who changes the fate of herself and those around her.

What really stood out for me was the author intricately plots a character driven romance that fights poignancy through the complex conflicts of fate. Morley ability to move the reader to see another multilayer in the book. We Are introduced to Hecate, {The only named Witch In Shakespearean play} She is often maligned as a witch, she has gained wisdom after enduring years of cruelty and abuse from a man who claimed to love her but cast her aside. She bears him three children, daughters, and they align themselves with the future Queen of Scotland, Gruah, to bring revenge upon the monsters of their past.

The Daughters of Hecate are, Sorcha, Alana, and Fiona – {The Unnamed witches in the Shakespearean play} There is a secret behind their birth leading to the throne of Scotland, but now they live as banished women in a small crannog on Loch Tay. Are they witches or victims like so many women of the politics of a Kingdom? The make three key predictions just like in the Shakespearean play, Macbeth. In Marley’s retelling there is an agenda to these woman.

Lady Macbeth, chooses to fight for her rightful place and seeks vengeance to the wrongs done to her in her and her family. Along with the man she herself has chosen like her ancestors before her, Gruah, and her husband Macbeth must conquer and remove all opposition in front of them to become the reigning King and Queen of Scotland.

Marley, paints exquisite picture with the spreading of Christianity, that changed Scotland transforming it from the old Pictish practiced of “Celtic polytheism”, a vague blend of druidism, paganism. When Gruah, unexpected meets with the King called the Edward, The Confessor, it causes her to question her bloodstained path and doubt her once mothers pagan ancestral faith.

D.K. Marley, beautifully descriptive writing grabbed my full attention all the way through to a satisfying end. This reworking storyline gives a voice to Gruah, Lady Macbeth like no other. As the chapters progressed, the characters are fleshed out as the political drama and intrigues of feudal Scotland come to life. The authors ability to engage the reader as she weaves all the characters into this plot driven novel, to create an astounding and powerful storyline of intrigue and violence of royals of 11th century Scotland.

This book was received as an ARC from Author, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

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A Woman’s Place in Medieval Scotland

Finding a woman’s place in medieval Scotland is often times hard to discern since there is such a lack of information not only for the area, but for the time period. Scotland, from the fifth century to the sixteenth century, was a patriarchal society and for a large part, many of the women of the time period, even noble figures, disappeared into the annals of time without any details being known of them, such as Margaret, the Maid of Norway, the uncrowned Queen.

Education for a noble girl such as Gruac (Lady Macbeth) would have been at a nunnery, however in Scotland, very few of these existed, so most noble families employed private tutors, but even this was extremely limited. Most women were consigned to the fate of domestic and agricultural life, with most girls marrying in their early teens (some as early as twelve) or twenties, such as is the case with Gruac.

The legal status of women was nil, since this was a patriarchal society, and daughters were to be subservient to their fathers, as well as wives to their husbands, thus any ambitious nature was viewed in the harshest terms. Passiveness and humility were the traits of an honourable woman, so it is understandable why someone like Lady Macbeth might have been viewed in unfavourable light. However, the historical records of her actual life indicate that she may indeed have been such a women, supporting her reigning husband for nearly two decades, yet in the absence of concrete evidence, the story behind such a woman blooms like a Scottish thistle.

I liked how one writer put it in my research of the women of Scotland in a book entitled “Rosslyn Chapel – Women in the Middle Ages” – 

“Women were subject to a strong element of social control. Gossip alone could ruin a reputation. Women sought to avoid any situation that might be construed as scandalous. Of course, enemies were prone to making up lies and name-calling could be very damaging to a young lady. Generally these rumours and insults questioned the sexual purity of a girl; such comments could stand in the way of a good marriage. Men were also subject to town gossip but it was generally less detrimental to the man’s reputation. Women often played an integral role in wartime and when the men were away at war, the women would take over the household. They were expected to protect the children and manage their husband’s affairs.”

I used this element in considering how the women surrounding Gruac, the wives of the other Thanes, as well as the wife and Queen of Donnchad, might have interacted with each other while their husbands were off fighting or debating over the throne.

Lady Macbeth is a unique woman in an age when ambition was frowned upon when displayed by a woman, and I feel she had to have shown a measure of that fiery passion, at least that is how I am portraying her.

Those of Scottish society relegated to the role of crone, or witches, or accused of such practices, were captured and killed, thus I wanted to portray the supposed three witches of Macbeth as what was more common for the day, which was those using their skills in healing. It is interesting that in my research I discovered that White Magic was based in Christian symbolism, focusing on nature and herbs; a sort of “good magic”. Most women who practised this sort of art used it for good luck, love spells, wealth and health. Alchemy, or potion-making, was  part of this practice, as well, so the images of the three witches can be understood in a different way for my book. However, since Christianity was becoming the mainstream religion and conscience of the day, many who “played in the shadows” or were borderline in the dark arts, were labelled witches and ultimately burned at the stake, thus the weaving of the story of Shakespeare into actual history in relation to the three women developed throughout The Fire of Winter in a way I hope feels real to the reader.

With Gruac and with all the other women in the storyline, I wanted to portray them in a way to feel authentic to the time period, their sufferings and their secret ambitions, while showing that no matter what century, women experienced the same ambitions, desires and passions as the modern woman today.

Check Out This Amazing Book Trailer!!

About the Author

D. K. Marley is a historical fiction writer specializing in Shakespearean themes. Her grandmother, an English Literature teacher, gave her a volume of Shakespeare’s plays when she was eleven, inspiring DK to delve further into the rich Elizabethan language. Eleven years ago she began the research leading to the publication of her first novel “Blood and Ink,” an epic tale of lost dreams, spurned love, jealousy and deception in Tudor England as the two men, William Shakespeare and Kit Marlowe, fight for one name and the famous works now known as the Shakespeare Folio. She is an avid Shakespearean / Marlowan, a member of the Marlowe Society, the Shakespeare Fellowship and a signer of the Declaration of Intent for the Shakespeare Authorship Debate. She has traveled to England three times for intensive research and debate workshops and is a graduate of the intense training workshop “The Writer’s Retreat Workshop” founded by Gary Provost and hosted by Jason Sitzes. She lives in Georgia with her husband and a Scottish Terriers named Maggie and Buster.

For more information, please visit D.K. Marley’s website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, July 22
Review & Guest Post at Gwendalyn’s Books

Tuesday, July 23
Review at Amy’s Booket List

Wednesday, July 24
Review at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Friday, July 26
Feature at Words and Peace

Monday, July 29
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Tuesday, July 30
Excerpt at The Order of the White Boar

Thursday, August 1
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books

Friday, August 2
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books

Monday, August 5
Review at Jorie Loves A Story

Tuesday, August 6
Review at History From a Woman’s Perspective

Thursday, August 8
Review at Coffee and Ink
Review at Faery Tales Are Real

Saturday, August 10
Interview at Jorie Loves A Story

Monday, August 12
Review at A Book Geek

Tuesday, August 13
Guest Post at History From a Woman’s Perspective

Wednesday, August 14
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Friday, August 16
Review at Impressions in Ink
Review at Book Reviews from Canada

Monday, August 19
Excerpt at Broken Teepee
Review at Passages to the Past

Giveaway

During the Blog Tour, we are giving away copies of The Fire of Winter + a surprise gift to three lucky winners! To enter, please use the Gleam form below.

Giveaway Rules

– Giveaway ends at 11:59 pm EST on August 19th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
– Giveaway is open to the US only.
– Only one entry per household.
– All giveaway entrants agree to be honest and not cheat the systems; any suspicion of fraud will be decided upon by blog/site owner and the sponsor, and entrants may be disqualified at our discretion.
– The winner has 48 hours to claim prize or a new winner is chosen.

The Fire of Winter
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Book Review Spin The Dawn

Hello Lovelies,

Welcome to my Book Review of Spin The Dawn

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim
Series: The Blood of Stars
Published July 9th 2019 by Knopf
Genre: young adult, fantasy, asian representation,

rating: ★★★★1/2

。・:*:・゚★,。・:*:・゚☆ 。★ 。☆ 。・:*:・゚★,。・:*:・゚☆ 。・:*:・゚★,。・:*: 。・:*:・゚★,。・:*:・゚☆

“Sendo used to tell me fairy tales. How he’d love mine if he were still alive: the tale of a girl who’d sewn the sun, the moon, and the stars into three dresses.”

Maia Tamarin dreams of becoming the greatest tailor in the land, but as a girl, the best she can hope for is to marry well. When a royal messenger summons her ailing father, once a tailor of renown, to court, Maia poses as a boy and takes his place. She knows her life is forfeit if her secret is discovered, but she’ll take that risk to achieve her dream and save her family from ruin. There’s just one catch: Maia is one of twelve tailors vying for the job.

Backstabbing and lies run rampant as the tailors compete in challenges to prove their artistry and skill. Maia’s task is further complicated when she draws the attention of the court magician, Edan, whose piercing eyes seem to see straight through her disguise.
And nothing could have prepared her for the final challenge: to sew three magic gowns for the emperor’s reluctant bride-to-be, from the laughter of the sun, the tears of the moon, and the blood of stars. 

Sendo used to tell me fairy tales. How he’d love mine if he were still alive: the tale of a girl who’d sewn the sun, the moon, and the stars into three dresses.”

His gaze bored into mine, deep and penetrating. Melting my resistance. “I know one thing, Maia Tamarin–being with you makes me happier than I have ever been.”

This book was received as an ARC from NetGalley,in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own 

This story follows Maia Tamarin, a girl with aspirations to be a tailor, but because she was born female all she can hope for is to make a good match in marriage. However, when her father, a renowned tailor in his own right is summoned by the royal court, Maia decides to pose as a boy to save her father from becoming even more ill on the journey. Aware that the penalty of death is imposed for her actions, she’s determined to overcome the hardships to become the best tailor. Except she’s one of twelve tailors eyeing the coveted position. Despite her skills, she becomes caught up in the schemes of saboteur tailors and is saved by the royal court magician Edan, who has seen through her disguise; his motives unclear. Her final challenge is the most difficult: crafting three dresses for the king’s bride-to-be using the laughter of the sun, the tears of the moon, and the blood of the stars. Her journey will set her on a path that she never imagined, 

Maia Tamarin, has aspirations to be a tailor, in world where women are subservient. Born the only girl in a family of three older brothers, with a Father as Tailor. She sacrifices everything to protect her family. In a turn of events she seizes the opportunity for a one in life time chance to become a Court Tailor. Maia decides to pose as a boy and Travel to court In disguise as her brother .while there she must avoid court intrigue and schemes of saboteur tailors .She must face her final challenge crafting three dresses for the king’s bride-to-be using the laughter of the sun, the tears of the moon, and the blood of the stars. 

Her journey will set her on a path that she never imagined.. 

The Author has creatively weaved One Thousand and One Nights into a Chinese-themed adventure story, with just enough sweet romance to make it a perfect read!
This is one of those books that you just have to read to know what feeling I’m getting at. It sucks you in and keeps you hungry for more until you reach the mind-blowing ending. It’s a unique and unforgettable magical storyline. Masterfully created spellbinding world. I devoured this one as fast as I could and was completely drawn into the lives of these characters.  I turned those pages as fast as I could and then slowly took in this beautifully written page turner. 
What I especially liked is Elizabeth Lim imaginative writing style. I feel in love with the overall premise of the novel, and the quick pace it kept me engaged. 

I highly recommend this book and look forward to reading the next installment in this series.

I am having a give away on my IG Account

Clink On The pic below, to take you there

Elizabeth Lim grew up on a hearty staple of fairy tales, myths, and songs. Her passion for storytelling began around age 10, when she started writing fanfics for Sailor Moon, Sweet Valley, and Star Wars, and posted them online to discover, “Wow, people actually read my stuff. And that’s kinda cool!” But after one of her teachers told her she had “too much voice” in her essays, Elizabeth took a break from creative writing to focus on not flunking English.

Over the years, Elizabeth became a film and video game composer, and even went so far as to get a doctorate in music composition. But she always missed writing, and turned to penning stories when she needed a breather from grad school. One day, she decided to write and finish a novel — for kicks, at first, then things became serious — and she hasn’t looked back since.

Elizabeth loves classic film scores, books with a good romance, food (she currently has a soft spot for arepas and Ethiopian food), the color turquoise, overcast skies, English muffins, cycling, and baking. She lives in New York City with her husband.

Book Tour and Reviewing

Soteria The Crisis Forge

by Roberto Arcoleo

@chandrapress

@RobertoArcoleo

Trigger Warnings: Adult Content

Sex, alcohol and Drug Use

Thank So Much Chandra Press for Sending Me This Book

This book was received as an ARC from the publisher and Author , in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own

With Time Running Out And The Fate Of Both Plants, Can Mark And Jason Unravel The Truth Before It’s To Late? …….

Release Date July 5th

https://www.chandrapress.com/

Set in Manhattan in the 1960’s, Soteria is a captivating and thrilling story of twin brothers facing corruption and incredible odds as they attempt to save Earth from annihilation.


SENT TO EARTH TO SAVE IT, MARK AND JASON MUST UNRAVEL THE TRUTH OF THEIR MISSION BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE.

While on a routine transportation run, an ore hauler from the planet Eldern discovers that humans on Earth have developed nuclear capabilities. What’s more, they learn an asteroid is on a trajectory that will destroy all known life on the planet forty years in the future. The Council of Eldern decides to intervene. A plan is drawn up and twin emissaries are sent to Earth to save it.

Mark and Jason grow up and settle into Manhattan in the 1960’s. With protests, vibrant art, and a thriving music scene, the city is pulsating with energy and the future looks bright. More powers are revealed to the twins but few details about their mission are provided. As the time grows closer for them to fulfill their duty, they sense that things are not as they seem.

With the fate of both planets in the balance and time running out, can Mark and Jason unravel the truth before it is too late? 

Soteria: The Crisis Forge by Roberto Arcoleo, Is a drama filled Syfy, with a character driven plot. Arcoleo, adds an alien infiltration trope and historical fictional of the turbulent times of Manhattan in the 1960’s.

In this well developed atmospheric book, the council on planet Eldern, devise a mission to save our Earth from a comet that is blazing its way across galaxies on a collision course. They send two subjects to evolve into believable influencers to Earth.

The two main protagonist Jason and Mark who are twin emissaries, with developing powers that can influence others. The twins face their own character struggles and experience along side the chaotic and changing times of Manhattan New York during the 60s. Creative plot twist when things are not at all what they seem, The twins must accomplish their task along with new discoveries and save their own world.

What stood out for me was the authors ability to create the Art, Music and energy of the 60’s time period along with science fiction elements made for a real engaging Syfy read.

ROBERTO ARCOLEO

Roberto Arcoleo was born in New York City, Queens to be exact, into a working-class Italian-American family. Roberto’s father was a hardworking, grumpy, and reserved restaurateur, his mother a warmhearted, talkative hairdresser. 

Roberto was a bit of both. He grew up in Astoria in a two-bedroom ground-floor apartment with one younger brother, his parents, and an invalid grandmother. His early years were tumultuous and confused. Roberto never felt that he fit into the molds that were laid before him. His early extended family home life was chaotic, and his teenage years were worse. After the Catholic grammar school, he continued on to a Catholic high school. He hated them both. 

As a teenager, Roberto felt more and more apart from his surroundings. He withdrew into his own world. To onlookers he seemed full of bravado, but he was timid and reserved at heart, always feeling out of place. He started lashing out at the world with violence as mark of distinction. He found a home within street gangs and hard drugs at fourteen. Roberto started living on the streets at fifteen, but was soon taken in by a schoolteacher uncle who lived on Long Island. His uncle held him captive from his own devices until he graduated high school.  Later, in college, he studied psychology hoping to find answers. Still troubled, he didn’t find the answers he needed in the text. He gave up his clinical ambitions for more underground alternatives. The same uncle gave him his first camera, and he discovered photography.

Under a name other than Arcoleo, he obtained recognition as an artist. He received his MFA from Brooklyn college and later saw his art reviewed in the New York Times. Roberto’s work has been acquired by major collections. Among them Brooklyn Museum, the Chrysler Museum, the Museum of Fine arts in Houston and the Museum de l’Eysee, Lausanne Switzerland. He was the first artist working in photography to be given a one-person exhibition at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art; he was awarded a stay at the American Academy in Rome; and his work is presently in the National Gallery of Art.

He always had an urge to write and his late mother was always asking for his first novel. He told her he had to wait until he was called from a special place.